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Submissions

For information about submitting your manuscript for the Hollis Summers Poetry Prize, see Hollis Summers Poetry Prize.

Submitting a Proposal

We request that you not submit your complete manuscript unless an editor has invited you to do so.

Your proposal should include a cover letter that includes a narrative description (2-4 typescript pages) of the proposed book's content and scope and an argument for the book's importance, as a rationale for publishing by the Ohio University Press. Why is this book needed? What will it contribute? How does it compare with other literature on the subject? Who is the audience for this book?

Your proposal should also include:

  1. A table of contents
  2. A sample chapter, or two
  3. The anticipated length of the manuscript
  4. The anticipated date of completion (if still a work-in-progress)
  5. An up-to-date copy of your curriculum vitae

Please send submissions to:

Ricky S. Huard
Acquisitions Editor
Ohio University Press
30 Park Place
Suite 101
Athens OH 45701

Submitting a Manuscript

If an editor has requested a full manuscript for review, we ask that you adhere to the following guidelines:

  1. Submit a hard copy of the manuscript. At the review stage, computer disk copy is not required.
  2. Manuscript copy should be double-spaced, on standard 8½" × 11" paper. Margins should be at least 1" on all sides. Dot matrix print is only acceptable if it is near-letter quality. Text should be unjustified (ragged right margin).
  3. Pages should be consecutively numbered and printed on one side only.
  4. A total word and/or character count for the work should be given. All text, including tables, charts, graphs, and illustrations, should be submitted. Text should include a table of contents, preface or introduction, all chapters, notes, bibliography, appendices or supplementary materials, and any other text to be included in the work.
  5. In general, Ohio University Press follows the stylistic guidelines in the Chicago Manual of Style and asks that authors prepare their manuscripts accordingly.
  6. All explanatory notes should be prepared as endnotes and placed at the end of the text. Ohio University Press does not accept footnotes, typed at the bottom of corresponding pages. Endnotes should also be prepared in accordance with the Chicago Manual of Style.
  7. Please provide full information about the permissions that have been or will have to be procured for quoted material and/or illustrations.

Guidelines and Checklists for the Submission of a Final Manuscript

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The Community Table
Effective Fundraising through Events
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Reflections
The American Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art
Reflections: The American Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art adds a novel and provocative element to the library of art museum collection catalogs, featuring selected works from the museum’s collection and accompanied by concise essays by scholars of art who reflect on respond to the distinctive aspects of each work.

Brides in the Sky
Stories and a Novella
Each of the crystalline worlds Cary Holladay brings us in the short stories and novella that make up Brides in the Sky has sisterhood, in all its urgency and peril, at its heart. She crafts these stories with subtle humor, a stunning sense of place, and an unerring eye for character.

Conflict Zone, Comfort Zone
Ethics, Pedagogy, and Effecting Change in Field-Based Courses
By taking students out of their comfort zone, field-based courses—which are increasingly popular in secondary and postsecondary education—have the potential to be deep, transformative learning experiences. But what happens when the field in question is a site of active or recent conflict?

The Plot Thickens
Illustrated Victorian Serial Fiction from Dickens to Du Maurier
In the early 1800s, books were largely unillustrated. By the 1830s and 1840s, however, innovations in wood- and steel-engraving techniques changed how Victorian readers consumed and conceptualized fiction. A new type of novel was born, often published in serial form, one that melded text and image as partners in meaning-making.