shopping_cart
Ohio University Press · Swallow Press · www.ohioswallow.com

Philosophy | Movements | Phenomenology

Philosophy | Movements | Phenomenology Book List

Sign up to be notified when new Philosophy | Movements | Phenomenology titles come out.

We will only use your email address to notify you of new titles in the subject area(s) you follow. We will never share your information with third parties.

Forthcoming

Cover of 'Motivation and the Primacy of Perception'

Motivation and the Primacy of Perception
Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Knowledge
By Peter Antich

Bridging phenomenology, philosophy of mind, and epistemology, Peter Antich asserts that the latter has long been hampered by an inadequate phenomenology of knowledge. However, a careful description of Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenon of motivation can offer compelling new ways to think about knowledge and longstanding epistemological questions.

Available

Cover of 'The Ever-Present Origin'

The Ever-Present Origin
By Jean Gebser
· Translation by Noel Barstad and Algis Mickunas

Gebser’s central thesis was that a potent “leap” in thinking was happening in the 20th century. This new mode of thought would be a holistic-centered, or integral one; an answer to the type of thinking responsible for economic and industrial crisis, two World Wars, and what many today consider a dire, global ecological crisis.

Cover of 'The Phenomenology of Pain'

The Phenomenology of Pain
By Saulius Geniusas

The Phenomenology of Pain is the first book-length investigation of its topic to appear in English. Groundbreaking, systematic, and illuminating, it opens a dialogue between phenomenology and the sciences to argue that science alone cannot clarify the nature of pain experience without incorporating a phenomenological approach.

Cover of 'Thinking between Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty'

Thinking between Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty
By Judith Wambacq

Questioning the dominant view that Deleuze and Merleau-Ponty have little of substance in common, Judith Wambacq draws on unpublished primary sources and current scholarship in English and French to bring them into a compelling dialogue to reveal a shared concern with the transcendental conditions of thought.

Cover of 'The Golden Age of Phenomenology at the New School for Social Research, 1954–1973'

The Golden Age of Phenomenology at the New School for Social Research, 1954–1973
Edited by Lester Embree and Michael D. Barber

These original essays focus on the introduction of phenomenology to the United States by the community of scholars who taught and studied at the New School for Social Research in New York City between 1954 and 1973. The collection powerfully traces the lineage and development of phenomenology in the North American context.

Cover of 'Athens and Jerusalem'

Athens and Jerusalem
By Lev Shestov
· Edited by Ramona Fotiade
· Translation by Bernard Martin
· Introduction by Ramona Fotiade

For more than two thousand years, philosophers and theologians have wrestled with the irreconcilable opposition between Greek rationality (Athens) and biblical revelation (Jerusalem).

Cover of 'The Crisis of Meaning and the Life-World'

The Crisis of Meaning and the Life-World
Husserl, Heidegger, Arendt, Patočka
By Ľubica Učník

Učník examines the existential conflict that formed the focus of Edmund Husserl’s final work: how to reconcile scientific rationality with the meaning of human existence. To investigate this conundrum, she places Husserl in dialogue with three of his most important successors: Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt, and Jan Patočka.

Cover of 'Merleau-Ponty'

Merleau-Ponty
Space, Place, Architecture
Edited by Patricia M. Locke and Rachel McCann

Phenomenology has played a decisive role in the emergence of the discourse of place, and the contribution of Merleau-Ponty to architectural theory and practice is well established. This collection of essays by 12 eminent scholars is the first devoted specifically to developing his contribution to our understanding of place and architecture.

Cover of 'Time, Memory, Institution'

Time, Memory, Institution
Merleau-Ponty's New Ontology of Self
Edited by David Morris and Kym Maclaren

This is the first investigation of the relation between time and memory in Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s thought as a whole and the first to explore in depth the significance of his concept of institution. It brings his views on the self and ontology into contemporary focus, arguing that the self is not a self-contained or self-determining identity.

Cover of 'Nature’s Suit'

Nature’s Suit
Husserl’s Phenomenological Philosophy of the Physical Sciences
By Lee Hardy

Edmund Husserl, founder of the phenomenological movement, is usually read as an idealist in his metaphysics and an instrumentalist in his philosophy of science. In Nature’s Suit, Lee Hardy argues that both views represent a serious misreading of Husserl’s texts.Drawing

Cover of 'The Tenets of Cognitive Existentialism'

The Tenets of Cognitive Existentialism
By Dimitri Ginev

In The Tenets of Cognitive Existentialism, Dimitri Ginev draws on developments in hermeneutic phenomenology and other programs in hermeneutic philosophy to inform an interpretative approach to scientific practices. At stake is the question of whether it is possible to integrate forms of reflection upon the ontological difference in the cognitive structure of scientific research. A positive answer would have implied a proof that (pace Heidegger) “science is able to think.”

Cover of 'Prophetic Politics'

Prophetic Politics
Emmanuel Levinas and the Sanctification of Suffering
By Philip J. Harold

In Prophetic Politics, Philip J. Harold offers an original interpretation of the political dimension of Emmanuel Levinas’s thought. Harold argues that Levinas’s mature position in Otherwise Than Being breaks radically with the dialogical inclinations of his earlier Totality and Infinity and that transformation manifests itself most clearly in the peculiar nature of Levinas’s relationship to politics.Levinas’s

Cover of 'Intersubjectivity Revisited'

Intersubjectivity Revisited
Phenomenology and the Other
By Kathleen M. Haney

Edmund Husserl’s theory of intersubjectivity is widely rejected even among phenomenologists. This is a crucial issue, since it is intersubjectivity that guarantees objectivity in Husserl’s philosophy. As many of his critics have pointed out, if Husserl’s account of intersubjectivity is inadequate, then his systematic transcendental phenomenology is jeopardized. But, is the case really settled?

Cover of 'The Ever-Present Origin'

The Ever-Present Origin
By Jean Gebser
· Translation by Noel Barstad and Algis Mickunas

Gebser’s central thesis was that a potent “leap” in thinking was happening in the 20th century. This new mode of thought would be a holistic-centered, or integral one; an answer to the type of thinking responsible for economic and industrial crisis, two World Wars, and what many today consider a dire, global ecological crisis.

Cover of 'The Ever-Present Origin'

The Ever-Present Origin
By Jean Gebser
· Translation by Noel Barstad and Algis Mickunas

Gebser’s central thesis was that a potent “leap” in thinking was happening in the 20th century. This new mode of thought would be a holistic-centered, or integral one; an answer to the type of thinking responsible for economic and industrial crisis, two World Wars, and what many today consider a dire, global ecological crisis.