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Literature

Literature Book List

Cover of 'Every River on Earth'

Every River on Earth
Writing from Appalachian Ohio
Edited by Neil Carpathios
· Foreword by Donald Ray Pollock

Every River on Earth: Writing from Appalachian Ohio includes some of the best regional poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction from forty contemporary authors such as David Baker, Don Bogen, Michelle Burke, Richard Hague, Donald Ray Pollock, and others.

American Literature · Appalachian Studies · Appalachia · Literature

Cover of 'Functions of Victorian Culture at the Present Time'

Functions of Victorian Culture at the Present Time
Edited by Christine L. Krueger

We are a century removed from Queen Victoria’s death, yet the culture that bears her name is alive and well across the globe. Not only is Victorian culture the subject of lively critical debate, but it draws widespread interest from popular audiences and consumers.Functions of Victorian Culture at the Present Time addresses the theme of the Victorians’ continuing legacy and its effect on our own culture and perception of the world.

Literature · Victorian Studies · British Literature · Literary Criticism

Cover of 'Rewriting Modernity'

Rewriting Modernity
Studies in Black South African Literary History
By David Attwell

Rewriting Modernity: Studies in Black South African Literary History connects the black literary archive in South Africa to international postcolonial studies via the theory of transculturation, a position adapted from the Cuban anthropologist Fernando Ortiz.

Literary Criticism, Africa · South Africa · Literature · African Studies

Cover of 'Haunted by Waters'

Haunted by Waters
Fly Fishing in North American Literature
By Mark Browning

Four essential questions: Why does one fish? How should one properly fish? What relations are created in fishing? And what effects does fishing have on the future? Haunted by Waters is a self-examination by the author as he constructs his own narrative and tries to answer these questions for himself. But it is also a thorough examination of the answers he uncovers in the course of reading what’s been written on the subject.As

Nature · Literature · American Literature · Literary Criticism

Cover of 'The Tangled Roots of Feminism, Environmentalism, and Appalachian Literature'

The Tangled Roots of Feminism, Environmentalism, and Appalachian Literature
By Elizabeth S. D. Engelhardt

Contemporaries were shocked when author Mary Noailles Murfree revealed she was a woman, but modern readers may be more surprised by her cogent discussion of community responses to unwanted development. Effie Waller Smith, an African American woman writing of her love for the Appalachian mountains, wove discussions of women’s rights, racial tension, and cultural difference into her Appalachian poetry.

American Literature · Women’s Studies · Appalachian Studies · Gender Studies · Ohio and Regional · Literature · Appalachia

Cover of 'The Novel of the Future'

The Novel of the Future
By Anaïs Nin
· Introduction by Deirdre Bair

In The Novel of the Future, Anaïs Nin explores the act of creation—in film, art, and dance as well as literature—to chart a new direction for the young artist struggling against what she perceived as the sterility, formlessness, and spiritual bankruptcy afflicting much of mid-twentieth-century fiction.

Literary Criticism · American Literature · Anaïs Nin · Creative Nonfiction · Literature

Cover of 'Shake Terribly the Earth'

Shake Terribly the Earth
Stories from an Appalachian Family
By Sarah Beth Childers

In a thoughtful, humorous voice born of Appalachian storytelling, Childers brings to life family tales that affected the entire region to make sense of her personal journey and find the joy and clarity that often emerge after the earth shakes terribly beneath us.

Memoir · Creative Nonfiction · Appalachia · United States · North America · Americas · Literature · Appalachian Studies · Ohio and Regional

Cover of 'A Spy in the House of Love'

A Spy in the House of Love
By Anaïs Nin
· Introduction by Anita Jarczok

Although Anaïs Nin found in her diaries a profound mode of self-creation and confession, she could not reveal this intimate record of her own experiences during her lifetime. Instead, she turned to fiction, where her stories and novels became artistic “distillations” of her secret diaries.

Literary Fiction · American Literature · Women Authors · Anaïs Nin · Literature

Cover of 'Mirages'

Mirages
The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1939–1947
By Anaïs Nin
· Edited by Paul Herron
· Introduction by Kim Krizan
· Preface by Paul Herron

Mirages opens at the dawn of World War II, when Anaïs Nin fled Paris, where she lived for fifteen years with her husband, banker Hugh Guiler, and ends in 1947 when she meets the man who would be “the One,” the lover who would satisfy her insatiable hunger for connection. In the middle looms a period Nin describes as “hell,” during which she experiences a kind of erotic madness, a delirium that fuels her search for love.

Diaries and Journals · Anaïs Nin · Literature

Cover of 'Anglophone Poetry in Colonial India, 1780–1913'

Anglophone Poetry in Colonial India, 1780–1913
A Critical Anthology
Edited by Mary Ellis Gibson

Anglophone Poetry in Colonial India, 1780–1913: A Critical Anthology makes accessible for the first time the entire range of poems written in English on the subcontinent from their beginnings in 1780 to the watershed moment in 1913 when Rabindranath Tagore won the Nobel Prize in Literature.Mary Ellis Gibson establishes accurate texts for such well-known poets as Toru Dutt and the early nineteenth-century poet Kasiprasad Ghosh.

Poetry Anthology · British Literature · 19th century · India · Literature · Victorian Studies

Cover of 'The Wife of Martin Guerre'

The Wife of Martin Guerre
By Janet Lewis
· Introduction by Kevin Haworth
· Afterword by Larry McMurtry

The Wife of Martin Guerre—based on a notorious trial in sixteenth-century France—is “one of the most significant short novels in English” (Atlantic Monthly). Originally published in 1941, it still raises questions about identity, belonging, and about an individual’s capacity to act within an inflexible system.

Literary Fiction · Historical Fiction · Women Authors · American Literature · France · Literature

Cover of 'The Trial of Sören Qvist'

The Trial of Sören Qvist
By Janet Lewis
· Introduction by Kevin Haworth

Originally published in 1947, The Trial of Sören Qvist has been praised by a number of critics for its intriguing plot and Janet Lewis’s powerful writing. And in the introduction to this new edition, Swallow Press executive editor and author Kevin Haworth calls attention to the contemporary feeling of the story—despite its having been written more than fifty years ago and set several hundred years in the past.

Literary Fiction · Historical Fiction · Women Authors · American Literature · Literature

Cover of 'Reading Victorian Deafness'

Reading Victorian Deafness
By Jennifer Esmail

Reading Victorian Deafness is the first book to address the crucial role that deaf people, and their unique language of signs, played in Victorian culture.

Literary Criticism, UK · Disability Studies · Medical Humanities · British History - Victorian Era · Victorian Studies · Victorian Era · Literature

Cover of 'Dragging Wyatt Earp'

Dragging Wyatt Earp
A Personal History of Dodge City
By Robert Rebein

In Dragging Wyatt Earp essayist Robert Rebein explores what it means to grow up in, leave, and ultimately return to the iconic Western town of Dodge City, Kansas. In chapters ranging from memoir to reportage to revisionist history, Rebein contrasts his hometown’s Old West heritage with a New West reality that includes salvage yards, beefpacking plants, and bored teenagers cruising up and down Wyatt Earp Boulevard.Along

Americas · North America · United States · Creative Nonfiction · Memoir · American Literature · Literature

Cover of 'Religious Imaginaries'

Religious Imaginaries
The Liturgical and Poetic Practices of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Adelaide Procter
By Karen Dieleman

Religious Imaginaries explores liturgical practice as formative for how three Victorian women poets imagined the world and their place in it and, consequently, for how they developed their creative and critical religious poetics.

Victorian Studies · British Literature · Literary Criticism · Literature · Christina Rossetti · Christianity · Religion · Poetry

Cover of 'Charity and Condescension'

Charity and Condescension
Victorian Literature and the Dilemmas of Philanthropy
By Daniel Siegel

Charity and Condescension explores how condescension, a traditional English virtue, went sour in the nineteenth century, and considers the ways in which the failure of condescension influenced Victorian efforts to reform philanthropy and to construct new narrative models of social conciliation.

Literature · Victorian Studies · Literary Criticism

Cover of 'Metaphor and the Slave Trade in West African Literature'

Metaphor and the Slave Trade in West African Literature
By Laura T. Murphy

Through an examination of metaphors that describe the trauma, loss, and suffering associated with the the transatlantic slave trade, Metaphor and the Slave Trade shows how the horrors of slavery are communicated from generation to generation and persist in West African discourse.

Literary Criticism, Africa · Slavery and Slave Trade · African Studies · Literature · Western Africa

Cover of 'Doctoring the Novel'

Doctoring the Novel
Medicine and Quackery from Shelley to Doyle
By Sylvia A. Pamboukian

If nineteenth-century Britain witnessed the rise of medical professionalism, it also witnessed rampant quackery. It is tempting to categorize historical practices as either orthodox or quack, but what did these terms really signify in medical and public circles at the time? How did they develop and evolve? What do they tell us about actual medical practices?Doctoring

Literary Criticism, UK · Medical Humanities · Victorian Studies · Literature

Cover of 'The Complete Works of Robert Browning, Volume XVII'

The Complete Works of Robert Browning, Volume XVII
With Variant Readings and Annotations
By Robert Browning
· Edited by Ashby Bland Crowder and Allan C. Dooley

In seventeen volumes, copublished with Baylor University, this acclaimed series features annotated texts of all of Robert Browning’s known writing. The series encompasses autobiography as well as influences bearing on Browning’s life and career and aspects of Victorian thought and culture.With

Victorian Studies · British Literature · Literature · Poetry

Cover of 'Literary Cincinnati'

Literary Cincinnati
The Missing Chapter
By Dale Patrick Brown

The history of Cincinnati runs much deeper than the stories of hogs that once roamed downtown streets. In addition to hosting the nation’s first professional baseball team, the Tall Stacks riverboat celebration, and the May Festival, there’s another side to the city—one that includes some of the most famous names and organizations in American letters.Literary

American Literature · Literature · Ohio and Regional

Cover of 'Meter Matters'

Meter Matters
Verse Cultures of the Long Nineteenth Century
Edited by Jason David Hall

Across the nineteenth century, meter mattered—in more ways and to more people than we might well appreciate today. For the period’s poets, metrical matters were a source of inspiration and often vehement debate. And the many readers, teachers, and pupils encountered meter and related topics in both institutional and popular forms.

Victorian Studies · Literature · Literary Criticism, UK · Literary Criticism

Cover of 'Anglophone Poetry in Colonial India, 1780–1913'

Anglophone Poetry in Colonial India, 1780–1913
A Critical Anthology
Edited by Mary Ellis Gibson

Anglophone Poetry in Colonial India, 1780–1913: A Critical Anthology makes accessible for the first time the entire range of poems written in English on the subcontinent from their beginnings in 1780 to the watershed moment in 1913 when Rabindranath Tagore won the Nobel Prize in Literature.Mary Ellis Gibson establishes accurate texts for such well-known poets as Toru Dutt and the early nineteenth-century poet Kasiprasad Ghosh.

Poetry Anthology · British Literature · 19th century · India · Literature · Victorian Studies

Cover of 'In the Shadows of Romance'

In the Shadows of Romance
Romantic Tragic Drama in Germany, England, and France
By Jeffrey N. Cox

In the Shadows of Romance examines the role of the tragedy in Germany, England and France during the romantic literary period. Cox responds to the prevailing dismissive view of the romantic tragic drama, effectively arguing for its place as expressions of the whole romantic movement and as a vital chapter in the history of Western literature.

Theater - History and Criticism · Literary Criticism · Literature

Cover of 'Indian Angles'

Indian Angles
English Verse in Colonial India from Jones to Tagore
By Mary Ellis Gibson

Indian Angles is a new historical approach to Indian English literature. It shows that poetry, not fiction, was the dominant literary genre of Indian writing in English until 1860 and recreates the historical webs of affiliation and resistance that writers in colonial India—writers of British, Indian, and mixed ethnicities—experienced.

Literary Criticism, UK · Literary Criticism, Asia · Literary Criticism, Poetry · India · Literature · Victorian Studies

Cover of 'An Invisible Rope'

An Invisible Rope
Portraits of Czesław Miłosz
Edited by Cynthia L. Haven

Czesław Miłosz (1911–2004) often seemed austere and forbidding to Americans, but those who got to know him found him warm, witty, and endlessly enriching. An Invisible Rope: Portraits of Czesław Miłosz presents a collection of remembrances from his colleagues, his students, and his fellow writers and poets in America and Poland.

Memoir · Literary Criticism, Eastern Europe · Poland · Polish and Polish-American Studies · Literature

Cover of 'Lit from Within'

Lit from Within
Contemporary Masters on the Art and Craft of Writing
Edited by Kevin Haworth and Dinty W. Moore

Lit from Within offers creative writers a window into the minds of some of America’s most celebrated contemporary authors. Witty, direct, and thought–provoking, these essays offer something to creative writers of all backgrounds and experience. With contributions from fiction writers, poets, and nonfiction writers, this is a collection of unusual breadth and quality.Contributors:

Essays · Literary Criticism, US · Literature

Cover of 'Amy Levy'

Amy Levy
Critical Essays
Edited by Naomi Hetherington and Nadia Valman

Amy Levy has risen to prominence in recent years as one of the most innovative and perplexing writers of her generation. Embraced by feminist scholars for her radical experimentation with queer poetic voice and her witty journalistic pieces on female independence, she remains controversial for her representations of London Jewry that draw unmistakably on contemporary antisemitic discourse.Amy

Literary Criticism, UK · Gender Studies · Jewish Studies · Victorian Studies · Literature

Cover of 'X Marks the Spot'

X Marks the Spot
Women Writers Map the Empire for British Children, 1790–1895
By Megan A. Norcia

During the nineteenth century, geography primers shaped the worldviews of Britain’s ruling classes and laid the foundation for an increasingly globalized world. Written by middle-class women who mapped the world that they had neither funds nor freedom to traverse, the primers employed rhetorical tropes such as the Family of Man or discussions of food and customs in order to plot other cultures along an imperial hierarchy.Cross-disciplinary

Literature · Women’s Studies · British Literature · Victorian Studies

Cover of 'Dancing out of Line'

Dancing out of Line
Ballrooms, Ballets, and Mobility in Victorian Fiction and Culture
By Molly Engelhardt

Dancing out of Line transports readers back to the 1840s, when the craze for social and stage dancing forced Victorians into a complex relationship with the moving body in its most voluble, volatile form.By

Victorian Studies · Literary Criticism, UK · Literary Criticism · Literature

Cover of 'Making Words Matter'

Making Words Matter
The Agency of Colonial and Postcolonial Literature
By Ambreen Hai

Why should Salman Rushdie describe his truth telling as an act of swallowing impure “haram” flesh from which the blood has not been drained? Why should Rudyard Kipling cast Kim, the imperial child–agent, as a body/text written upon and damaged by empire? Why should E. M. Forster evoke through the Indian landscape the otherwise unspeakable racial or homosexual body in his writing?

Literature · Literary Criticism