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Ohio University Press · Swallow Press · www.ohioswallow.com

Fiction

Fiction Book List

Cover of 'The Fields'

The Fields
By Conrad Richter

Conrad Richter’s trilogy of novels The Trees (1940), The Fields (1946), and The Town, (1950) traces the transformation of Ohio from wilderness to farmland to the site of modern industrial civilization, all in the lifetime of one character. The trilogy earned Richter immediate acclaim as a historical novelist. The Town won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1951, and The Trees was a Book-of-the-Month Club selection soon after it was published.

Cover of 'Not Out of Hate'

Not Out of Hate
A Novel of Burma
By Ma Ma Lay
· Edited by William H. Frederick
· Translation by Margaret Aung-Thwin
· Introduction by Anna Allott
· Afterword by Robert E. Vore

Ma Ma Lay’s 1955 novel of the marriage between a rural teenager to a powerful Anglophile twenty years her senior, set in prewar Burma, is an engaging drama, finely observed work of social realism, and stirring rejection of Western cultural dominance by Burma’s foremost female author and one of its preeminent voices for change.

Cover of 'Justina of Andalusia and Other Stories'

Justina of Andalusia and Other Stories
By Natalie L. M. Petesch

This collection of stories is, like Petesch’s previous work, distinguished by its brilliant lyrical intensity and by characters who are stunningly alive. It is a powerful collection about impassioned cultural conflicts in present-day Spain and Mexico; it is also a book about ourselves—how we have failed to love the Earth and have squandered our resources.In the title story, it is Justina Olivia who breaks the moral law of her village in an unforgettable love story.

Cover of 'The Laughing West'

The Laughing West
Humorous Western Fiction, Past and Present
By Charles L. Sonnichsen

Without humor, the American West would be a vast territory of arid clichés — stolid cowboys and fearless lawmen, or, in more modern visions, dastardly land developers and fanatical environmentalists — all of them as lifeless as an alkalai flat.

Cover of 'At the Palaces of Knossos'

At the Palaces of Knossos
By Nikos Kazantzakis
· Translation by Theodora Vasils and Themi Vasils

Blending historical fact and classical myth, the author of Zorba the Greek and The Last Temptation of Christ transports the reader 3,000 years into the past, to a pivotal point in history: the final days before the ancient kingdom of Minoan Crete is to be conquered and supplanted by the emerging city-state of Athens. Translated by Theodora Vasils and Themi Vasils.The

Cover of 'Pike’s Peak'

Pike’s Peak
A Mining Saga
By Frank Waters

During the fabulous reign of Colorado Silver, innumerable prospectors passed by Pike’s Peak on their way to the silver strikes at Leadville, Aspen, and the boom camps in the Saguache, Sangre de Cristo, and San Juan mountain. Then, in 1890, a carpenter named Winfield Scott Stratton discovered gold along Cripple Creek. By 1900, this six square mile area on the south slope of Pike’s Peak supported 475 mines and led the world in gold production.

Cover of 'Interior Country'

Interior Country
Stories of the Modern West
Edited by Alexander Blackburn, Craig Lesley, and Jill Landem

A mile down the road from the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, a woman unearths an ancient shard of pottery bearing the thousands-year-old thumbprint of a Navawi‘i woman. A marriage is thrown into crisis by the husband’s discovery, on a fishing trip, of a girl’s corpse. To impress the prostitute he wants to marry, a man constructs a homemade atomic bomb.

Cover of 'The Woman at Otowi Crossing'

The Woman at Otowi Crossing
By Frank Waters

Based on the real life of Edith Warner, who ran a tearoom at Otowi Crossing, just below Los Alamos, The Woman at Otowi Crossing is the story of Helen Chalmer, a person in tune with her adopted environment and her neighbors in the nearby Indian pueblo and also a friend of the first atomic scientists. The secret evolution of atomic research is a counterpoint to her psychic development.In

Cover of 'Flight from Fiesta'

Flight from Fiesta
By Frank Waters

Frank Waters, whose work has spanned half a century, has continually attempted to depict the reconciliation of opposites, to heal the national wounds of polarization.Flight From Fiesta, Waters’ first novel in nearly two decades, is testimony to that aspiration, emerging as a moving and masterfully–told story of two characters who must discover the potential for common ground between their personalities.Set in Santa Fe in the mid–fifties, the story itself is deceptively simple.

Cover of 'Flowering Mimosa'

Flowering Mimosa
By Natalie L. M. Petesch

Flowering Mimosa is a story of lost innocence and coming of age among the disinherited of America in the 1980’s. Against a backdrop of social and economic disruption in the American southwest, Petesch traces the fates of the Wingfield family, who have lost their Texas farm and moved to a mining town in Silver Valley, Idaho.As various tensions threaten to break the family apart, Tamsen Wingfield reacts most strongly.

Cover of 'The Lizard Woman'

The Lizard Woman
By Frank Waters

“The novel was begun in 1926, when I was twenty-four years old and working as a telephone engineer in Imperial Valley, on the California-Baja California border. During my stay there I made a horseback trip down into the little-known desert interior of Lower California. After having lived all of my early years in the high Rockies of California, I was unprepared for the vast sweep of sunstruck desert with its flat wastes, clumps of cacti, and barren parched-rock ranges.

Cover of 'From Sleep Unbound'

From Sleep Unbound
By Andrée Chedid

From Sleep Unbound portrays the life of Samya, an Egyptian woman who is taken at age 15 from her Catholic boarding school and forced into a loveless and humiliating marriage. Eventually sundered from every human attachment, Samya lapses into despair and despondence, and finally an emotionally caused paralysis. But when she shakes off the torpor of sleep, the sleep of avoidance, she awakens to action with the explosive energy of one who has been reborn.

Cover of 'Cricket Sings'

Cricket Sings
A Novel of Pre-Columbian Cahokia
By Kathleen King

For Cricket Sings, Cahokia medicine woman, the omens have been bad. She is old, and so at this year’s Sun Ceremony she will tell her stories, the tales handed down from grandparents to grandchildren since the memory of the People began. The Sun King is dying, unable to perfom the Ceremony which will bring good crops to the fields.

Cover of 'Duncan’s Colony'

Duncan’s Colony
By Natalie L. M. Petesch

“During the nineteen sixties, following the missile crisis and during the Vietnam War, communitarian societies began to reappear in the United States. Those who were of an invincibly optimistic nature gathered together in agrarian or utopian communes reminiscent of the nineteenth century.

Cover of 'Alexander the Great'

Alexander the Great
A Novel
By Nikos Kazantzakis
· Translation by Theodora Vasils

In this historical novel based on the life of Alexander the Great, Kazantzakis has drawn on both the rich tradition of Greek legend and the documented manuscripts from the archives of history to recreate an Alexander in all his many-faceted images.

Cover of 'The Gunnysack Castle'

The Gunnysack Castle
By Julian Silva

The Gunnysack Castle is principally the story of Vince Woods, and Anglicized Portuguese who rises from the ashes of his childhood dreams to become one of San Oriel’s wealthiest and most powerful citizens. A man of strong lusts and inflexible will, he attempts to manipulate the members of his family just as he does everyone else in the town who comes under his influence. The dynasty he longs to found ends in bitterness with his own demise.Concurrent

Cover of 'The Ghost of Monsieur Scarron'

The Ghost of Monsieur Scarron
By Janet Lewis

This third novel in the three Cases of Circumstantial Evidence provides an intimate portrayal of deception and corruption in one small poor Parisian family in the late 1600s. In contrast to the majesty of the court of Louis XIV and the bloodthirsty crowds of Paris at that time, the simple lives of Jean Larcher and his wife and son are pitiably ruined by the presence of a seducer and his political pamphlets. The result: personal and public passions mesh to hang an innocent man.

Cover of 'Under a Glass Bell'

Under a Glass Bell
By Anaïs Nin

Under a Glass Bell is one of Nin’s finest collections of stories. First published in 1944, it attracted the attention of Edmond Wilson, who reviewed the collection in The New Yorker. It was in these stories that Nin’s artistic and emotional vision took shape.

Winner of Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, 1951
Cover of 'The Town'

The Town
By Conrad Richter

In the final novel of Richter’s Awakening Land trilogy, Sayward Wheeler completes her mission and lives to see the transition of her family and her friends, American pioneers, from the ways of wilderness to the ways of civilization. The Town, for which Richter won the Pulitzer Prize in 1951, is a much bigger book in every way than its predecessors; it is itself a rich contribution to literature and with the other novels comprises a great American epic.

Cover of 'The Fathers'

The Fathers
By Allen Tate
· Introduction by Arthur Mizener

The Fathers is the powerful novel by the poet and critic recognized as one of the great men of letters of our time.Old Major Buchan of Pleasant Hill, Fairfax County, Virginia, lived by a gentlemen’s agreement to ignore what was base or rude, to live a life which was gentle and comfortable because it was formal.

Cover of 'The Yogi of Cockroach Court'

The Yogi of Cockroach Court
By Frank Waters

In this novel of the mestizo, or mixed-blood, Frank Waters completes the Southwestern canvas begun in The Man Who Killed the Deer and People of the Valley. Set in a violent Mexican border town, the story centers on Barby, a tormented mestizo, Guadalupe, the mestiza “percentage-girl,” and Tai-Ling, the serene yogi.

Cover of 'Spy in the House of Love'

Spy in the House of Love
By Anaïs Nin

Although Anaïs Nin found in her diaries a profound mode of self-creation and confession, she could not reveal this intimate record of her own experiences during her lifetime. Instead, she turned to fiction, where her stories and novels became artistic “distillations” of her secret diaries.

Cover of 'Collages'

Collages
By Anaïs Nin

Collages began with an image which had haunted me. A friend, Renate, had told me about her trip to Vienna where she was born, and of her childhood relationships to statues. She told me stories of her childhood, her relationship to her father, her first love.I begin the novel with:Vienna was the city of statues. They were as numerous as the people who walked the streets.

Cover of 'Seduction of the Minotaur'

Seduction of the Minotaur
By Anaïs Nin

An excerpt from Seduction of the Minotaur:Some voyages have their inception in the blueprint of a dream, some in the urgency of contradicting a dream. Lillian’s recurrent dream of a ship that could not reach the water, that sailed laboriously, pushed by her with great effort, through city streets, had determined her course toward the sea, as if she would give this ship, once and for all, its proper sea bed.She

Cover of 'The Four-Chambered Heart'

The Four-Chambered Heart
By Anaïs Nin

The Four-Chambered Heart, Anas Nin’s 1950 novel, recounts the real-life affair she conducted with caf guitarist Gonzalo Mor in 1936. Nin and Mor rented a house-boat on the Seine, and under the pervading influence of the boat’s watchman and Mor’s wife Helba, developed a relationship. Mor named the boat Nanankepichu, meaning not really a home.

Cover of 'Ladders to Fire'

Ladders to Fire
By Anaïs Nin
· Foreword by Gunther Stuhlmann

After struggling with her own press and printing her own works, Anaïs Nin succeeded in getting Ladders to Fire accepted and published in 1946. This recognition marked a milestone in her life and career. Admitted into the fellowship of American novelists, she maintained the individuality of her literary style.

Cover of 'Children of the Albatross'

Children of the Albatross
By Anaïs Nin

Children of the Albatross is divided into two sections: “The Sealed Room” focuses on the dancer Djuna and a set of characters, chiefly male, who surround her; “The Café” brings together a cast of characters already familiar to Nin’s readers, but it is their meeting place that is the focal point of the story.As always, in Children of the Albatross, Nin’s writing is inseparable from her life.

Cover of 'The Man Who Killed the Deer'

The Man Who Killed the Deer
A Novel of Pueblo Indian Life
By Frank Waters

The story of Martiniano, the man who killed the deer, is a timeless story of Pueblo Indian sin and redemption, and of the conflict between Indian and white laws; written with a poetically charged beauty of style, a purity of conception, and a thorough understanding of Indian values.

Cover of 'People of the Valley'

People of the Valley
By Frank Waters

One of Frank Waters’s most popular novels, People of the Valley takes place high in the Sangre de Cristo mountains where an isolated Spanish-speaking people confront a threatening world of change.