shopping_cart
Ohio University Press · Swallow Press · www.ohioswallow.com

Art History

Art History Book List

Sign up to be notified when new Art History titles come out.

We will only use your email address to notify you of new titles in the subject area(s) you follow. We will never share your information with third parties.

Cover of 'Modernist Art in Ethiopia'

Modernist Art in Ethiopia
By Elizabeth W. Giorgis

In locating her arguments at the intersection of visual culture and literary and performance studies, Giorgis details how innovations in visual art intersected with shifts in narratives of modernity. The result is a bold intellectual, cultural, and political history of Ethiopia, with art as its centerpiece.

Cover of 'Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, Cleveland’s Free Stamp'

Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, Cleveland’s Free Stamp
By Edward J. Olszewski

In 1985, the Sohio oil company commissioned Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen to design and construct a large outdoor sculpture for its new corporate headquarters in Cleveland, Ohio. The result was Free Stamp, a bold and distinctive installation that captured both a Pop Art sensibility and a connection to the city’s industrial past. Sohio executives approved the design, and work was already underway, when British Petroleum acquired the company.

Cover of 'The Art of Life in South Africa'

The Art of Life in South Africa
By Daniel Magaziner

From 1952 to 1981, South Africa’s apartheid government ran an art school for the training of African art teachers at Indaleni, in what is today KwaZulu-Natal. The Art of Life in South Africa is the story of the students, teachers, art, and politics that circulated through a small school, housed in a remote former mission station.

Cover of 'Winold Reiss and the Cincinnati Union Terminal'

Winold Reiss and the Cincinnati Union Terminal
Fanfare for the Common Man
By Gretchen Garner

After designing and installing the massive murals for the Cincinnati Union Terminal in the 1930s, German immigrant artist Winold Reiss fell into relative obscurity, despite the vibrancy and boldness of his meticulous mosaic works. Art historian Garner pays this early modernist his due, putting him in the context of his international peers and the art movements that continue to invigorate our aesthetic landscape today.

Cover of 'The Illustrated Letters of Richard Doyle to His Father, 1842–1843'

The Illustrated Letters of Richard Doyle to His Father, 1842–1843
By Richard Doyle
· Edited by Grant F. Scott

Before he joined the staff of Punch and designed its iconic front cover, illustrator Richard “Dicky” Doyle was a young man whose father (political caricaturist John Doyle) charged him with sending a weekly letter, even though they lived under the same roof. This volume collects the fifty-three illustrated missives in their entirety for the first time and provides an uncommon peek into the intimate but expansive observations of a precocious social commentator and artist.In

Cover of 'A Stitch in Time'

A Stitch in Time
The Needlework of Aging Women in Antebellum America
By Aimee E. Newell

Drawing from 167 examples of decorative needlework—primarily samplers and quilts from 114 collections across the United States—made by individual women aged forty years and over between 1820 and 1860, this exquisitely illustrated book explores how women experienced social and cultural change in antebellum America.The book is filled with individual examples, stories, and over eighty fine color photographs that illuminate the role that samplers and needlework played in the culture of the time.

Cover of 'San Rock Art'

San Rock Art
By J.D. Lewis-Williams

San rock paintings, scattered over the range of southern Africa, are considered by many to be the very earliest examples of representational art. There are as many as 15,000 known rock art sites, created over the course of thousands of years up until the nineteenth century. There are possibly just as many still awaiting discovery.Taking

Cover of 'The Engraving Trade in Early Cincinnati'

The Engraving Trade in Early Cincinnati
With a Brief Account of the Beginning of the Lithographic Trade
By Donald C. O'Brien

Examines the vibrant engraving industry that helped fuel the growth of the “Queen City” and established its influence as the midwestern center for the print and engraving trade.

Cover of 'Irish People, Irish Linen'

Irish People, Irish Linen
By Kathleen Curtis Wilson

The story of Irish linen is a story of the Irish people. Many thousands of men and women made Irish linen a global product and an international brand. It is also a story of innovation and opportunity. Irish linen has served its makers as sail cloth of incredible strength and durability for world exploration and trade; it has functioned as watertight containers for farmers and firemen; it has soothed the brows of royalty and absorbed the sweat of the working class.

Cover of 'Midwest Modern'

Midwest Modern
The Color Woodcuts of Mabel Hewit
Edited by Jane Glaubinger

The first book to showcase the work of this Ohio artist and important modernist printmaker.

Cover of 'Philena’s Friendship Quilt'

Philena’s Friendship Quilt
A Quaker Farewell to Ohio
By Lynda Salter Chenoweth

Lynda Salter Chenoweth reveals the value of signature quilts as historic and social documents waiting to be read. Her research to discover the story behind an 1853 Ohio Quaker signature quilt uncovers the identity of the quilt’s recipient, her life and community, and a striking feature of the quilt itself—a “hidden” design element.

Cover of 'Incidental Architect'

Incidental Architect
William Thornton and the Cultural Life of Early Washington, D.C., 1794–1828
By Gordon S. Brown

While the majority of scholarship on early Washington focuses on its political and physical development, in Incidental Architect Gordon S. Brown describes the intellectual and social scene of the 1790s and early 1800s through the lives of a prominent couple whose cultural aspirations served as both model and mirror for the city’s own.When William and Anna Maria Thornton arrived in Washington, D.C., in 1794, the new nation’s capital was little more than a raw village.

Cover of 'Bessie Potter Vonnoh'

Bessie Potter Vonnoh
Sculptor of Women
By Julie Aronson

In the Gilded Age, when most sculptors aspired to produce monuxadments, Bessie Potter Vonnoh (1872–1955) made significant contributions to small bronze sculpture and garden statuary designed for the embellishment of the home. Her work commanded admiration for her fluid and suggestive modeling, graceful lines, and sculptural form. In 1904 Bessie Potter Vonnoh won the gold medal for sculpture at the St.

Cover of 'Paris on the Potomac'

Paris on the Potomac
The French Influence on the Architecture and Art of Washington, D.C.
Edited by Cynthia R. Field, Isabelle Gournay, and Thomas P. Somma

In 1910 John Merven Carrère, a Paris-trained American architect, wrote, “Learning from Paris made Washington outstanding among American cities.” The five essays in Paris on the Potomac explore aspects of this influence on the artistic and architectural environment of Washington, D.C., which continued long after the well-known contributions of Peter Charles L’Enfant, the transplanted French military officer who designed the city’s plan.Isabelle

Cover of 'Pictorial Victorians'

Pictorial Victorians
The Inscription of Values in Word and Image
By Julia Thomas

The Victorians were image obsessed. The middle decades of the nineteenth century saw an unprecedented growth in the picture industry. Technological advances enabled the Victorians to adorn with images the pages of their books and the walls of their homes. But this was not a wholly visual culture. Pictorial Victorians focuses on two of the most popular mid-nineteenth-century genres—illustration and narrative painting—that blurred the line between the visual and textual.Illustration