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American History

American History Book List

Cover of 'The History of Indiana Law'

The History of Indiana Law
Edited by David J. Bodenhamer and Randall T. Shepard

Long regarded as a center for middle-American values, Indiana is also a cultural crossroads that has produced a rich and complex legal and constitutional heritage. The History of Indiana Law traces this history through a series of expert articles by identifying the themes that mark the state’s legal development and establish its place within the broader context of the Midwest and nation.The

Cover of 'For the Prevention of Cruelty'

For the Prevention of Cruelty
The History and Legacy of Animal Rights Activism in the United States
By Diane L. Beers

Animal rights. Those two words conjure diverse but powerful images and reactions. Some nod in agreement, while others roll their eyes in contempt. Most people fall somewhat uncomfortably in the middle, between endorsement and rejection, as they struggle with the profound moral, philosophical, and legal questions provoked by the debate. Today, thousands of organizations lobby, agitate, and educate the public on issues concerning the rights and treatment of nonhumans.For

Cover of 'The Papers of Clarence Mitchell Jr., Volume II'

The Papers of Clarence Mitchell Jr., Volume II
1944–1946
By Clarence Mitchell Jr.
· Edited by Denton L. Watson

Clarence Mitchell Jr. was the driving force in the movement for passage of civil rights laws in America. The foundation for Mitchell’s struggle was laid during his tenure at the Fair Employment Practice Committee, where he led implementation of President Roosevelt’s policy barring racial discrimination in employment in the national defense and war industry programs. Mitchell’s FEPC reports and memoranda chart the beginning of the modern civil rights movement.The

Cover of 'The Papers of Clarence Mitchell Jr., Volume I'

The Papers of Clarence Mitchell Jr., Volume I
1942–1943
By Clarence Mitchell Jr.
· Edited by Denton L. Watson

Clarence Mitchell Jr. was the driving force in the movement for passage of civil rights laws in America. The foundation for Mitchell’s struggle was laid during his tenure at the Fair Employment Practice Committee, where he led implementation of President Roosevelt’s policy barring racial discrimination in employment in the national defense and war industry programs. Mitchell’s FEPC reports and memoranda chart the beginning of the modern civil rights movement.The

Cover of 'Closing Arguments'

Closing Arguments
Clarence Darrow on Religion, Law, and Society
By Clarence Darrow
· Edited by S. T. Joshi

Clarence Darrow, son of a village undertaker and coffinmaker, rose to become one of America’s greatest attorneys—and surely its most famous. The Ohio native gained renown for his central role in momentous trials, including his 1924 defense of Leopold and Loeb and his defense of Darwinian principles in the 1925 Scopes “Monkey Trial.”

Cover of 'Ohio Volunteer'

Ohio Volunteer
The Childhood and Civil War Memoirs of Captain John Calvin Hartzell, OVI
Edited by Charles I. Switzer

When his captain was killed during the Battle of Perryville, John Calvin Hartzell was made commander of Company H, 105th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He led his men during the Battle of Chickamauga, the siege of Chattanooga, and the Battle of Missionary Ridge.

Cover of 'The Emergence of the Moundbuilders'

The Emergence of the Moundbuilders
The Archaeology of Tribal Societies in Southeastern Ohio
Edited by Elliot M. Abrams and AnnCorinne Freter

Native American societies, often viewed as unchanging, in fact experienced a rich process of cultural innovation in the millennia prior to recorded history. Societies of the Hocking River Valley in southeastern Ohio, part of the Ohio River Valley, created a tribal organization beginning about 2000 bc.Edited

Winner of the Great Lakes American Studies Association/Ohio University Press Book Award
Cover of 'Building on a Borrowed Past'

Building on a Borrowed Past
Place and Identity in Pipestone, Minnesota
By Sally J. Southwick

Why is there a national monument near a small town on the Minnesota prairie? Why do the town’s residents dress as Indians each summer and perform a historical pageant based on a Victorian-era poem? To answer such questions, Building on a Borrowed Past: Place and Identity in Pipestone, Minnesota shows what happens when one culture absorbs the heritage of another for civic advantage.Founded

Cover of 'Frontiers of Freedom'

Frontiers of Freedom
Cincinnati’s Black Community 1802–1868
By Nikki M. Taylor

Nineteenth-century Cincinnati was northern in its geography, southern in its economy and politics, and western in its commercial aspirations. While those identities presented a crossroad of opportunity for native whites and immigrants, African Americans endured economic repression and a denial of civil rights, compounded by extreme and frequent mob violence. No other northern city rivaled Cincinnati’s vicious mob spirit.Frontiers

Cover of 'DeVoto’s West'

DeVoto’s West
History, Conservation, and the Public Good
By Bernard DeVoto
· Edited by Edward K. Muller

Social commentator and preeminent western historian Bernard DeVoto vigorously defended public lands in the West against commercial interests. By the time of his death in 1955, DeVoto had published criticism, history, and fiction. He had won both the Pulitzer and Bancroft prizes. But his most passionate writing—at once incisive and eloquent—advocated conservation of America’s prairies, rangeland, forests, mountains, canyons, and deserts.DeVoto’s

Ohioana Book Award Finalist
Cover of 'Coal and Culture'

Coal and Culture
Opera Houses in Appalachia
By William Faricy Condee

Opera houses were fixtures of Appalachian life from the end of the Civil War through the 1920s. The only book on opera houses that stresses their cultural context, Condee’s unique study will interest cultural geographers, scholars of Appalachian studies, and all those who appreciate the gaudy diversity of the American scene.

Cover of 'Immigration, Diversity, and Broadcasting in the United States 1990—2001'

Immigration, Diversity, and Broadcasting in the United States 1990—2001
By Vibert C. Cambridge

The last decade of the twentieth century brought a maturing of the new racial and ethnic communities in the United States and the emergence of diversity and multiculturalism as dominant fields of discourse in legal, educational, and cultural contexts.

Cover of 'A Second Voice'

A Second Voice
A Century of Osteopathic Medicine in Ohio
By Carol Poh Miller

Doctors of osteopathy today practice side by side with medical doctors, employing the same diagnostic and curative tools of scientific medicineu2009—u2009with a difference. Focusing on the historical experience of Ohio, historian Carol Poh Miller illuminates struggles common to osteopathic medicine nationwide as it fought to secure its place in American health care.

Winner of the 2001 Kulczycki Prize Awarded by the Polish American Historical Association  · Winner of the 2004 Oskar Halecki Prize
Cover of 'The Exile Mission'

The Exile Mission
The Polish Political Diaspora and Polish Americans, 1939–1956
By Anna D. Jaroszyńska-Kirchmann

At midcentury, two distinct Polish immigrant groups—those Polish Americans who were descendants of economic immigrants from the turn of the twentieth century and the Polish political refugees who chose exile after World War II and the communist takeover in Poland—faced an uneasy challenge to reconcile their concepts of responsibility toward the homeland.The new arrivals did not consider themselves simply as immigrants, but rather as members of the special category of political refugees.

Cover of 'Religion in Ohio'

Religion in Ohio
Profiles of Faith Communities
Edited by Tarunjit Singh Butalia and Dianne P. Small

Religion in Ohio tells the story of Ohio’s religious and spiritual heritage going back to the state’s ancient and historic native populations, the development of a wide variety of faith traditions in the years preceding the mid-twentieth century, and the arrival of many newer immigrants in the last fifty years.

Cover of 'American Pantheon'

American Pantheon
Sculptural and Artistic Decoration of the United States Capitol
Edited by Donald R. Kennon and Thomas P. Somma

Like the ancient Roman Pantheon, the U.S. Capitol was designed by its political and aesthetic arbiters to memorialize the virtues, events, and persons most representative of the nation’s ideals—an attempt to raise a particular version of the nation’s founding to the level of myth.American Pantheon examines the influences upon not only those virtues and persons selected for inclusion in the American pantheon, but also those excluded.

Winner of the Great Lakes American Studies Association/Ohio University Press Book Award
Cover of 'Sales and Celebrations'

Sales and Celebrations
Retailing and Regional Identity in Western New York State, 1920–1940
By Sarah Elvins

Between the two world wars, the retail world experienced tremendous changes. New forms of competition, expanded networks of communication and transportation, and the proliferation of manufactured goods posed challenges to department store and small shopkeeper alike.In western New York, and in Buffalo and Rochester in particular, retailers were a crucial part of urban life, acting as cultural brokers and civic leaders. They were also cultivators of area pride.

Cover of 'Extracting Appalachia'

Extracting Appalachia
Images of the Consolidation Coal Company, 1910–1945
By Geoffrey L. Buckley

As a function of its corporate duties, the Consolidation Coal Company, one of the largest coal-mining operations in the United States during the first half of the twentieth century, had photographers take hundreds of pictures of nearly every facet of its operations. Whether for publicity images, safety procedures, or archival information, these photographs create a record that goes far beyond the purpose the company intended.In

Winner of the 2004 Award of Merit from the Historical Society of Michigan
Cover of 'The Paradox of Progress'

The Paradox of Progress
Economic Change, Individual Enterprise, and Political Culture in Michigan, 1837–1878
By Martin J. Hershock

Americans have long recognized the central importance of the nineteenth-century Republican party in preserving the Union, ending slavery, and opening the way for industrial capitalism.

Cover of 'The Negro in the American Rebellion'

The Negro in the American Rebellion
His Heroism and His Fidelity
By William Wells Brown
· Edited by John David Smith

In 1863, as the Civil War raged, the escaped slave, abolitionist, and novelist William Wells Brown identified two groups most harmful to his race. “The first and most relentless,” he explained, “are those who have done them the greatest injury, by being instrumental in their enslavement and consequent degradation.

Cover of 'Profiles of Ohio Women, 1803–2003'

Profiles of Ohio Women, 1803–2003
By Jacqueline Jones Royster

Developed by the Ohio Bicentennial Commission’s Advisory Council on Women, this collection profiles a few of the many women who have left their imprint on the state, nation, world, and even outer space.

Cover of 'Wyeth People'

Wyeth People
By Gene Logsdon

Wyeth People is the story of one writer’s search for the meaning of artistic creativity, approached from personal contact with the work of one of the world’s great artists, Andrew Wyeth.In the 1960s, just beginning his career as a writer, Gene Logsdon read a magazine article about Andrew Wyeth in which the artist commented at length on his own creative impulse.

Cover of 'Seeking the One Great Remedy'

Seeking the One Great Remedy
Francis George Shaw and Nineteenth-Century Reform
By Lorien Foote

A radical abolitionist and early feminist, Francis George Shaw (1809–1882) was a prominent figure in American reform and intellectual circles for five decades. He rejected capitalism in favor of a popular utopian socialist movement; during the Civil War and Reconstruction, he applied his radical principles to the Northern war effort and to freedmen’s organizations.A partnership with Henry George in the late 1870s provided an international audience for Shaw’s alternative vision of society.

Cover of 'From Blackjacks to Briefcases'

From Blackjacks to Briefcases
A History of Commercialized Strikebreaking and Unionbusting in the United States
By Robert Michael Smith

From the beginning of the Industrial Age and continuing into the twenty-first century, companies faced with militant workers and organizers have often turned to agencies that specialized in ending strikes and breaking unions. Although their secretive nature has made it difficult to fully explore the history of this industry, From Blackjacks to Briefcases does just that.By

Winner of the Oskar Halecki Prize · Winner of the 2000 Polish American Historical Association Kulczycki Prize · Winner of the Choice Award for Outstanding Academic Title
Cover of 'Traitors and True Poles'

Traitors and True Poles
Narrating a Polish-American Identity, 1880–1939
By Karen Majewski

During Poland’s century-long partition and in the interwar period of Poland’s reemergence as a state, Polish writers on both sides of the ocean shared a preoccupation with national identity. Polish-American immigrant writers revealed their persistent, passionate engagement with these issues, as they used their work to define and consolidate an essentially transnational ethnic identity that was both tied to Poland and independent of it.By

Cover of 'Ohio on the Move'

Ohio on the Move
Transportation in the Buckeye State
By H. Roger Grant

Few American states can match the rich and diverse transportation heritage of Ohio. Every major form of public conveyance eventually served the Buckeye state. From the “Canal Age” to the “Interurban Era,” Ohio emerged as a national leader. The state’s central location, abundant natural resources, impressive wealth, shrewd business leadership, and episodes of good fortune explain the dynamic nature of its transport past.Ohio

Listed in The Magazine Antiques as one of the top eleven recommended books on American samplers and needlework.
Cover of 'Ohio Is My Dwelling Place'

Ohio Is My Dwelling Place
Schoolgirl Embroideries, 1800–1850
By Sue Studebaker

One of the most intriguing cultural artifacts of our nation’s past was made by young girls—the embroidery sampler. In Ohio Is My Dwelling Place, American decorative arts expert Sue Studebaker documents the samplers created in Ohio prior to 1850, the girls who made them, their families, and the teachers who taught them to stitch.In

Cover of 'An American Colony'

An American Colony
Regionalism and the Roots of Midwestern Culture
By Edward Watts

The Old Northwest—the region now known as the Midwest—has been largely overlooked in American cultural history, represented as a place smoothly assimilated into the expanding, manifestly-destined nation. An American Colony: Regionalism and the Roots of Midwestern Culture studies the primary texts and principal conflicts of the settlement of the Old Northwest to reveal that its entry into the nation’s culture was not without problems.

Cover of 'An Amulet of Greek Earth'

An Amulet of Greek Earth
Generations of Immigrant Folk Culture
By Helen Papanikolas

The boys and men who left their Greek valley and mountain villages in the early 1900s for America came with amulets their mothers had made for them. Some were miniature sacks attached to a necklace; more often they were merely a square of fabric enclosing the values of their lives: a piece of a holy book or a sliver of the True Cross representing their belief in Greek Orthodoxy; a thyme leaf denoting their wild terrain; a blue bead to ward off the Evil Eye; and a pinch of Greek earth.In

Cover of 'Flash Effect'

Flash Effect
Science and the Rhetorical Origins of Cold War America
By David J. Tietge

The ways science and technology are portrayed in advertising, in the news, in our politics, and in the culture at large inform the way we respond to these particular facts of life. The better we are at recognizing the rhetorical intentions of the purveyors of information and promoters of mass culture, the more adept we become at responding intelligently to them.Flash

Cover of 'American Coverlets and Their Weavers'

American Coverlets and Their Weavers
Coverlets from the Collection of Foster and Muriel McCarl
By Clarita S. Anderson

Coverlets woven in vibrant colors of red, blue, white, and green are as popular today as they were in the nineteenth century.American Coverlets and Their Weavers is a lavishly illustrated guide to one of the premier collections of coverlets in the nation. As such, it is also an essential reference for collectors, historians, specialists in material culture, and others who are interested in American textiles.Published

Cover of 'The House and Senate in the 1790s'

The House and Senate in the 1790s
Petitioning, Lobbying, and Institutional Development
Edited by Kenneth R. Bowling and Donald R. Kennon

Amid the turbulent swirl of foreign intrigue, external and internal threats to the young nation’s existence, and the domestic partisan wrangling of the 1790s, the United States Congress solidified its role as the national legislature. The ten essays in The House and Senate in the 1790s demonstrate the mechanisms by which this bicameral legislature developed its institutional identity.

Cover of 'Montgomery C. Meigs and the Building of the Nation’s Capital'

Montgomery C. Meigs and the Building of the Nation’s Capital
Edited by William C. Dickinson, Donald R. Kennon, and Dean A. Herrin

At the age of thirty-six, in 1852, Lt. Montgomery Cunningham Meigs of the Army Corps of Engineers reported to Washington, D.C., for duty as a special assistant to the chief army engineer, Gen. Joseph G. Totten. It was a fateful assignment, both for the nation’s capital and for the bright, ambitious, and politically connected West Point graduate.Meigs’s forty-year tenure in the nation’s capital was by any account spectacularly successful.

Cover of 'Art As Image'

Art As Image
Prints and Promotion in Cincinnati, Ohio
Edited by Alice M. Cornell

Illustrates the spectacular technological and artistic developments in the nineteenth-century printing trade from the earliest days of the Old Northwest Territory.

Cover of 'Headquarters in the Brush'

Headquarters in the Brush
Blazer’s Independent Union Scouts
By Darl L. Stephenson

A comprehensive reassessment of a valiant band of Yankee soldiers

Cover of 'Dust Bowl, USA'

Dust Bowl, USA
Depression America and the Ecological Imagination, 1929–1941
By Brad D. Lookingbill

Whether romantic or tragic, accounts of the dramatic events surrounding the North American Dust Bowl of the “dirty thirties” unearthed anxieties buried deep in America’s ecological imagination. Moreover, the images of a landscape of fear remain embedded in the national consciousness today. In vivid form, the aesthetic of suffering captured in Dorothea Lange’s photographs and Woody Guthrie’s folk songs created the myths and memories of the Depression generation.Dust

Cover of 'Art and Empire'

Art and Empire
The Politics of Ethnicity in the United States Capitol, 1815–1860
By Vivien Green Fryd

The subject matter and iconography of much of the art in the U.S. Capitol forms a remarkably coherent program of the early course of North American empire, from discovery and settlement to the national development and westward expansion that necessitated the subjugation of the indigenous peoples.In Art and Empire, Vivien Green Fryd’s revealing cultural and political interpretation of the portraits, reliefs, allegories, and historical paintings commissioned for the U.S.

Cover of 'Managing the Counterrevolution'

Managing the Counterrevolution
The United States and Guatemala, 1954–1961
By Stephen M. Streeter

The Eisenhower administration’s intervention in Guatemala is one of the most closely studied covert operations in the history of the Cold War. Yet we know far more about the 1954 coup itself than its aftermath. This book uses the concept of “counterrevolution” to trace the Eisenhower administration’s efforts to restore U.S. hegemony in a nation whose reform governments had antagonized U.S. economic interests and the local elite.Comparing the Guatemalan case to U.S.-sponsored

Cover of 'The Documentary Heritage of Ohio'

The Documentary Heritage of Ohio
Edited by Phillip R. Shriver and Clarence E. Wunderlin Jr.

Key to the successful teaching and learning of history is its personalization. In presenting documents that help Ohio’s rich history come alive in the minds of its readers, this book has purposely sought to provide eyewitness, first-person narratives that will make the reader want to turn the page and keep on reading.

Cover of 'Sowing the American Dream'

Sowing the American Dream
How Consumer Culture Took Root in the Rural Midwest
By David Blanke

From 1840 to 1900, midwestern Americans experienced firsthand the profound economic, cultural, and structural changes that transformed the nation from a premodern, agrarian state to one that was urban, industrial, and economically interdependent. Midwestern commercial farmers found themselves at the heart of these changes. Their actions and reactions led to the formation of a distinctive and particularly democratic consumer ethos, which is still being played out today.By

Cover of 'West Virginia Quilts and Quiltmakers'

West Virginia Quilts and Quiltmakers
Echoes from the Hills
By Fawn Valentine

Tucked away in the Appalachian Mountains of West Virginia, preserved for generations, handmade bed quilts are windows into the past. In 1983, three West Virginia county extension agents discussed the need to locate and document their state’s historic quilts. Mary Nell Godbey, Margaret Meador, and Mary Lou Schmidt joined with other concerned women to found the West Virginia Heritage Quilt Search.The

Cover of 'My Sisters Telegraphic'

My Sisters Telegraphic
Women in the Telegraph Office, 1846–1950
By Thomas C. Jepsen

The role of the telegraph operator in the mid-nineteenth century was like that of today’s software programmer/analyst, according to independent scholar Tom Jepsen, who notes that in the “cyberspace” of long ago, male operators were often surprised to learn that the “first-class man” on the other end of the wire was a woman.Like the computer, the telegraph caused a technological revolution.

Cover of 'The United States Capitol'

The United States Capitol
Designing and Decorating a National Icon
Edited by Donald R. Kennon

The United States Capitol is a national cultural icon, and among the most visually recognized seats of government in the world. The past quarter century has witnessed an explosion of scholarly interest in the art and architectural history of the Capitol. The emergence of the historic preservation movement and the maturation of the discipline of art conservation have refocused attention on the Capitol as the American “temple of liberty.”

Cover of 'Revisiting U.S. Trade Policy'

Revisiting U.S. Trade Policy
Decisions in Perspective
Edited by Alfred E. Eckes Jr.

In trade policy, as in many other areas of public policy, decision makers often confront present and future problems with little understanding of how similar disputes were resolved in the past. Too often, busy public officials had no time to write or record negotiating histories. Revisiting U.S. Trade Policy, which is certain to become a classic in the literature of trade negotiations, is just such a record.Built on the oral histories of thirty-five former U.S.

Cover of 'Staking Her Claim'

Staking Her Claim
The Life of Belinda Mulrooney, Klondike and Alaska Entrepreneur
By Melanie J. Mayer and Robert N. DeArmond

If Horatio Alger had imagined a female heroine in the same mold as one of the young male heroes in his rags-to-riches stories, she would have looked like Belinda Mulrooney. Smart, ambitious, competitive, and courageous, Belinda Mulrooney was destined through her legendary pioneering in the wilds of the Yukon basin to found towns and many businesses. She built two fortunes, supported her family, was an ally to other working women, and triumphed in what was considered a man’s world.In

Cover of 'Ohio’s First Peoples'

Ohio’s First Peoples
By James H. O'Donnell

Ohio’s First Peoples depicts the Native Amerxadicans of the Buckeye State from the time of the Hopewell peoples to the forced removal of the Wyandots in the 1840s.

Cover of 'Soliloquy of a Farmer’s Wife'

Soliloquy of a Farmer’s Wife
The Diary of Annie Elliott Perrin
Edited by Dale B. J. Randall

Diary of a Geneva, Ohio, farmer’s wife, Annie Perrin, who wrote during the final battles, climax, and close of World War I.

Cover of 'Inventing Congress'

Inventing Congress
Origins and Establishment of the First Federal Congress
Edited by Kenneth R. Bowling and Donald R. Kennon

On March 4, 1789, New York City’s church bells pealed, cannons fired, and flags snapped in the wind to celebrate the date set for the opening of the First Federal Congress. In many ways the establishment of Congress marked the culmination of the American Revolution as the ship of state was launched from the foundation of the legislative system outlined in Article I of the Constitution.Inventing

Cover of 'Mountain People in a Flat Land'

Mountain People in a Flat Land
A Popular History of Appalachian Migration to Northeast Ohio, 1940–1965
By Carl E. Feather

First popular history of Appalachian migration to one community—Ashtabula County, an industrial center in the fabled “best location in the nation.”

Cover of 'Good-Bye to Old Peking'

Good-Bye to Old Peking
The Wartime Letters of U.S. Marine Captain John Seymour Letcher, 1937–1939
Edited by Katie Letcher Lyle and Roger B. Jeans

For two and a half years (1937-1939), Captain John Seymour Letcher commanded a company of the U.S. Embassy Marine Guard in Peking. During that time, he wrote a series of letters to his parents in Virginia describing the life of a Westerner in the former imperial city. During that same time, China was invaded by Japan.Captain Letcher describes the flavor of life in pre-Communist China—the food, servants, cold Peking winters and torrid summers, hunting, and excursions to the major tourist sites.B

Cover of 'Athens, Ohio'

Athens, Ohio
The Village Years
By Robert L. Daniel

In a lively style peppered with firsthand accounts by the people who made Athens, author Robert L. Daniel narrates his tale with wry humor and a sharp eye for detail.

Cover of 'Argentina, the United States, and the Anti-Communist Crusade in Central America, 1977–1984'

Argentina, the United States, and the Anti-Communist Crusade in Central America, 1977–1984
By Ariel Armony
· Foreword by Thomas W. Walker

Ariel Armony focuses, in this study, on the role played by Argentina in the anti–Communist crusade in Central America. This systematic examination of Argentina’s involvement in the Central American drama of the late 1970s and early 1980s fine–tunes our knowledge of a major episode of the Cold War era.Basing his study on exhaustive research in the United States, Argentina, and Nicaragua, Armony adroitly demolishes several key assumptions that have shaped the work of scholars in U.S.

Cover of 'Lionel Sotheby’s Great War'

Lionel Sotheby’s Great War
Diaries and Letters from the Western Front
By Lionel Sotheby
· Edited by Donald C. Richter
· Introduction by Donald C. Richter
· Foreword by Peter H. Liddle

The “butterfly” that emerged in World War I trench warfare in 1915 aspired to kill: “I cannot explain,” the diary continues. “It comes unseen and makes you oblivious of almost everything at times, save one intense desire to kill, kill, kill, the Germans.”Lionel Sotheby’s diary and letters are a compelling first-person account of the harrowing experiences of the young British lieutenant at the Western Front. His writing reveals constant peril, hourly discomfort, and gruesome injuries.

Cover of 'Making of Legends'

Making of Legends
More True Stories of Frontier America
By Mark Dugan

Some of the American West’s grandest legends are about people who in reality were remorseless killers, robbers, and bandits. These outlaws flourished during the 1800s and gained notoriety throughout the following century. How did their fame persist, and what has inspired the publishing, movie, and television industries to recreate their fictionalized careers over and over again?Mark Dugan brings reality to the forefront in The Making of Legends.

Cover of 'The Centennial Atlas of Athens County, Ohio'

The Centennial Atlas of Athens County, Ohio
Illustrations, History, Statistics
Edited by Fred W. Bush

Unique and invaluable portrait of a bustling turn–of–the–century community.

Cover of 'Upper Mississippi River Rafting Steamboats'

Upper Mississippi River Rafting Steamboats
By Edward A. Mueller

As a Wisconsin historical marker explains:“After 1837 the vast timber resources of northern Wisconsin were eagerly sought by settlers moving into the mid-Mississippi valley. By 1847 there were more than thirty saw-mills on the Wisconsin, Chippewa, and St. Croix river systems, cutting largely Wisconsin white pine.During long winter months, logging crews felled and stacked logs on the frozen rivers. Spring thaws flushed the logs down the streams toward the Mississippi River.

John Lyman Book Award (North American Society for Oceanic History), Honorable Mention
Cover of 'Way’s Packet Directory, 1848–1994'

Way’s Packet Directory, 1848–1994
Passenger Steamboats of the Mississippi River System since the Advent of Photography in Mid-Continent America
By Frederick Way Jr.
· Foreword by Joseph W. Rutter

The first Mississippi steamboat was a packet, the New Orleans, a sidewheeler built at Pittsburgh in 1811, designed for the New Orleans-Natchez trade. Packets dominated during the first forty years of steam, providing the quickest passenger transportation throughout mid-continent America. The packets remained fairly numerous even into the first two decades of the twentieth century when old age or calamity overtook them.

Cover of 'To Possess the Land'

To Possess the Land
A Biography of Arthur Rochford Manby
By Frank Waters

Ambitious and only 24 years old, Arthur Manby arrived from England in the Territory of New Mexico in 1883, and saw in its wilderness an empire that he believed himself destined to rule. For his kingdom, he chose a vast Spanish land grant near Taos, a wild 100,000 acres whose ancient title was beyond question. Obsessed, he poured more than 20 years into his dream of glory, and schemed, stole, lied, cajoled, begged, and bribed to take the vast grant from its rightful owners.

Cover of 'George Montague Wheeler'

George Montague Wheeler
The Man and the Myth
By Doris O. Dawdy

Until Dawdy’s “The Wyant Diary” appeared in Arizona and the West in 1980, it was virtually unknown that Lt. Wheeler was the leader of the government exploring party from which artist A. H. Wyant returned with a paralyzed arm. So little used were government reports prior to the mid-twentieth century that not one of the writers and compilers of information about this prominent artist, known to have been with a military expedition, had looked at the most likely report, that of Lt.

Cover of 'Suicide or Murder?'

Suicide or Murder?
The Strange Death of Governor Meriwether Lewis
By Vardis Fisher

The death of Meriwether Lewis is one of the great mysteries of American history. Was he murdered at Grinder’s Stand or did he commit suicide? Vardis Fisher meticulously reconstructs the events and presents his own version of the case with the precision and persuasiveness of a fine trial lawyer. But Fisher was also a great novelist and it is his sense of character that serves him best here.

Cover of 'Weather Pioneers'

Weather Pioneers
The Signal Corps Station at Pikes Peak
By Phyllis Smith

At 14,110 feet, the weather station atop Pikes Peak, Colorado, was the highest in the world in 1873. Young men trained by the Signal Corps took turns living year-round on the isolated mountain, where they endured loneliness, primitive living conditions, lack of financial support and appreciation, and deteriorating health. Most did so with dedication and good humor.

Cover of 'Timberline Tailings'

Timberline Tailings
Tales of Colorado’s Ghost Towns and Mining Camps
By Muriel Sibell Wolle

Cover of 'Log Construction in the Ohio Country, 1750–1850'

Log Construction in the Ohio Country, 1750–1850
By Donald A. Hutslar

Log construction entered the Ohio territory with the seventeenth-century fur traders and mid-eighteenth-century squatters and then spread throughout most of the area after the opening of the territory in the 1780s. Scottish-Irish and German settlers, using techniques from the eastern states and European homelands, found the abundant timber resources of the Ohio country ideally suited to this simple, durable form of construction.

Cover of 'Goldfield'

Goldfield
The Last Gold Rush on The Western Frontier
By Sally Zanjani

“The discovery of Goldfield, Nevada, in 1902, along with the earlier discovery of Tonopah in 1900, marked the revival of mining in Nevada. Mining production, which had escalated after the discovery of the Comstock Lode in 1859, dropped to almost nothing with the decline of the Comstock in the 1870s. Without continued mining production, the state entered what proved to be a twenty-year depression period that ultimately led some observers to suggest that Nevada be deprived of its statehood.

Cover of 'An African American in South Africa'

An African American in South Africa
The Travel Notes of Ralph J. Bunche 28 September 1937–1 January 1938
By Ralph Bunche
· Edited by Robert R. Edgar

Ralph Bunche, who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950, traveled to South Africa for three months in 1937. His notes, which have been skillfully compiled and annotated by historian Robert R. Edgar, provide unique insights on a segregated society.

Cover of 'Tales Never Told Around the Campfire'

Tales Never Told Around the Campfire
True Stories of Frontier America
By Mark Dugan

Ten outlaws, ten states, ten stories of nineteenth-century fugitives remarkable because the events really took place. Mark Dugan’s latest outlaw chase reins in enough evidence to corral the cynics. There is new information on the strange relationship between Wild Bill Hickok, his enemy and victim, David McCanles, and the beautiful Sarah Shull of North Carolina. Was Tom Horn a hired killer for the big cattlemen in the unsolved Wyoming ambush? How much do we really know about Deputy U.S.

Cover of 'Knight of the Road'

Knight of the Road
The Life of Highwayman Ham White
By Mark Dugan

The American public has long been fascinated by the Old West and the so–called heroes that it produced. Even before the days of Jesse James, Billy the Kid, and the dime novel, the public’s heroes have always been somewhat tainted. Numerous stories of chivalry and gallantry have been accredited to outlaws, but all tales have been based upon folklore and legends. Mark Dugan, however, gives us a bona fide American Robin Hood with Ham White.

Cover of 'Way’s Steam Towboat Directory'

Way’s Steam Towboat Directory
By Frederick Way Jr. and Joseph W. Rutter

After the initial release in 1983 of Way’s Packet Directory, 1848–1983, the demand was enormous for a similar treatment of the steam towboats that once populated the Mississippi River System. Captain Frederick Way, Jr.,

Cover of 'Quivira'

Quivira
Europeans in the region of the Santa Fe Trail, 1540–1820
By William Brandon

New Mexico was a frontier to the wilderness, for Europeans, for almost three hundred years. No other frontier history in the area of what is now the United States can support such continuity, or even come close. It was the outside edge of the northern borderlands of New Spain, that later became the northern borderlands of Mexico. It was the western rim of the world for the French explorers and fur traders in the Mississippi valley and for the English who followed them there.

Cover of 'George Kennan and the American-Russian Relationship, 1865–1924'

George Kennan and the American-Russian Relationship, 1865–1924
By Frederick F. Travis

George Kennan’s career as a specialist on Russian affairs began in 1865, with his first journey to the Russian empire. A twenty-year-old telegraphic engineer at the time, he was a member of the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition, a now virtually unknown but nevertheless remarkable nineteenth-century adventure story.

Cover of 'Buckeye Rovers in the Gold Rush'

Buckeye Rovers in the Gold Rush
An Edition of Two Diaries
By H. Lee Scamehorn
· Edited by Edwin P. Banks and Jamie Lytle-Webb

When “California Fever” raced through southeastern Ohio in the spring of 1849, a number of residents of Athens County organized a cooperative venture for traveling overland to the mines. Known as the “Buckeye Rovers,” the company began its trip westward in early April. The Buckeye Rovers, along with thousands who traveled the overland route to California, endured numerous hardships and the seemingly constant threat of attacks from hostile Indians.

Cover of 'Buckeye Rovers in the Gold Rush'

Buckeye Rovers in the Gold Rush
An Edition of Two Diaries
By H. Lee Scamehorn
· Edited by Edwin P. Banks and Jamie Lytle-Webb

When “California Fever” raced through southeastern Ohio in the spring of 1849, a number of residents of Athens County organized a cooperative venture for traveling overland to the mines. Known as the “Buckeye Rovers,” the company began its trip westward in early April. The Buckeye Rovers, along with thousands who traveled the overland route to California, endured numerous hardships and the seemingly constant threat of attacks from hostile Indians.

Cover of 'Klondike Women'

Klondike Women
True Tales of the 1897–1898 Gold Rush
By Melanie J. Mayer

Klondike Women is a compelling collection of historical photographs and first-hand accounts of the adventures, challenges, and disappointments of women on the trails to the Klondike gold fields. In the midst of a depression near the turn of the twentieth century, these women dared to act on the American dream.

Cover of 'Survival On a Westward Trek, 1858–1859'

Survival On a Westward Trek, 1858–1859
The John Jones Overlanders
By Dwight L. Smith

When gold was discovered in the Fraser River country of British Columbia in the 1850s, St. Paul, Minnesota became the departure point for the plunge westward, as was St. Louis for the American gold rushes. Minnesotans soon caught the fever. Nine young men set out in July of 1858 for the goldfields of British Columbia.

Cover of 'Mexico Mystique'

Mexico Mystique
The Coming Sixth World of Consciousness
By Frank Waters

In Mexico Mystique Frank Waters draws us deeply into the ancient but still-living myths of Mexico. To reveal their hidden meanings and their powerful symbolism, he brings to bear his gift for intuitive imagination as well as a broad knowledge of anthropology, Jungian psychology, astrology, and Eastern and esoteric religions. He offers a startling interpretation of the Mayan Great Cycle — our present Fifth World — whose beginning has been projected to 3113 B.C.,