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Ohio University Press · Swallow Press · www.ohioswallow.com

American History, Midwest

American History, Midwest Book List

Selected as a 2007 Michigan Notable Book
Winner of Michigan’s State History Award
Cover of 'The History of Michigan Law'

The History of Michigan Law
Edited by Paul Finkelman and Martin J. Hershock

The History of Michigan Law offers the first serious survey of Michigan’s rich legal past. Michigan legislators have played a leading role in developing modern civil rights law, protecting the environment, and assuring the right to counsel for those accused of crimes. Michigan was the first jurisdiction in the English-speaking world to abolish the death penalty.

Cover of 'The Black Laws'

The Black Laws
Race and the Legal Process in Early Ohio
By Stephen Middleton

Beginning in 1803, the Ohio legislature enacted what came to be known as the Black Laws. These laws instituted barriers against blacks entering the state and placed limits on black testimony against whites.

Cover of 'The Center of a Great Empire'

The Center of a Great Empire
The Ohio Country in the Early Republic
Edited by Andrew R. L. Cayton and Stuart D. Hobbs

The people who lived in what became the seventeenth state in the American Union in 1803 were not only at the center of a great empire, they were at the center of the most important historical developments in the revolutionary Atlantic World.

Cover of 'The History of Ohio Law'

The History of Ohio Law
By Michael Les Benedict and John F. Winkler

The History of Ohio Law is a complete sourcebook on the origin and development of Ohio law and its relationship to society. A model for work in this field, it is the starting point for any investigation of the subject.In the two-volume The History of Ohio Law, distinguished legal historians, practicing Ohio attorneys, and judges present the history of Ohio law and the interaction between law and society in the state.

Cover of 'Ohio University, 1804–2004'

Ohio University, 1804–2004
The Spirit of a Singular Place
By Betty Hollow

Lively narrative depicting the historical, academic, and cultural events that shaped one of Ohio’s premier universities.

Cover of 'Creating a Perfect World'

Creating a Perfect World
Religious and Secular Utopias in Nineteenth-Century Ohio
By Catherine M. Rokicky

Powerful currents of religious revival and political and social reform swept nineteenth-century America. Many people expressed their radical religious and social ideals by creating or joining self-contained utopian communities. These utopianists challenged the existing social and economic order with alternative notions about religion, marriage, family, sexuality, property ownership, and wage labor.Between 1787 and 1919, approximately 270 utopian communities existed in the United States.

Cover of 'Buckeye Women'

Buckeye Women
The History of Ohio’s Daughters
By Stephane Elise Booth

An accessible and comprehensive account of the role Ohio women have assumed in the history of the state and a narrative of their hardships and of the victories that have been won in the past two hundred years.

Cover of 'Rookwood and the Industry of Art'

Rookwood and the Industry of Art
Women, Culture, and Commerce, 1880–1913
By Nancy E. Owen

Rookwood Pottery of Cincinnati—the largest, longest-lasting, and arguably most important American Art Pottery—reflected the country’s cultural and commercial milieux in the production, marketing, and consumption of its own products.Rookwood

Cover of 'Home and Away'

Home and Away
The Rise and Fall of Professional Football on the Banks of the Ohio, 1919–1934
By Carl M. Becker

A history of semiprofessional football clubs in Ohiou2009—u2009the Ironton Tanks, the Portsmouth Spartans, and othersu2009—u2009and an intimate study of how the citizens and organizations that made up these cities worked to put themselves on the map.

Cover of 'Barns of the Midwest'

Barns of the Midwest
Edited by Allen G. Noble and Hubert G. H. Wilhelm

For many, the barn is the symbol of the Midwestern United States. It represents tangible wealth, solid citizenship, industry, stability, and other agrarian values associated with its conservative, Anglo-Saxon settlers.Editors Noble and Wilhelm set out to examine these stereotypes. European settlement of the Midwest, though primarily English and German, was never homogenous and the character of the Midwest barn reflects this.