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Ohio University Press · Swallow Press · www.ohioswallow.com

Series

New Series


African Studies


History


US History


Research in International Studies


Appalachia, Ohio, and the Midwest


Victorian Studies


Juvenile Nonfiction



New Titles

Welcome to the Neighborhood
An Anthology of American Coexistence
How to live with difference is a defining worry in contemporary America. In this enormously rich resource for the classroom and for anyone interested in reflecting on what it means to be American today, poets, fiction writers, and essayists, with open minds and nuance, ask what it means to be neighbors.

Michael Field
Decadent Moderns
As “Michael Field,” Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper conversed with fin-de-siècle aesthetic movements and twentieth-century modernism, articulated ideas associated with the New Woman, and expressed queer desire. Essays address Michael Field’s engagements with a range of cultural touchstones, highlighting their work’s radicalism and relevance.

Ambivalent
Photography and Visibility in African History
Ambivalent makes photography an engaging and important subject of historical investigation. Contributors bring photography into conversation with orality, travel writing, ritual, psychoanalysis, and politics, with new approaches to questions of race, time, and postcolonial and decolonial histories.

The Politics of Disease Control
Sleeping Sickness in Eastern Africa, 1890–1920
Situating sleeping sickness control within African intellectual worlds and political dynamics, Webel prioritizes local histories to understand the successes and failures of a widely used colonial public health intervention—the sleeping sickness camp—in dialogue with African strategies to mitigate illness and death in the past.

Africa Every Day
Fun, Leisure, and Expressive Culture on the Continent
Africa Every Day is a multidisciplinary and accessible counterpoint to the prevailing emphasis on war, poverty, corruption, and other challenges on the continent. Essays address creative and dynamic elements of daily life without romanticizing them, showing that African leisure and popular culture are the product of dynamism and adaptation.