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Ohio University Press · Swallow Press · www.ohioswallow.com

Internships

Guidelines for Editorial Department Internship (English 491)

The editorial department intern will assist in the preparation of book manuscripts at the Ohio University Press, a not-for-profit scholarly press publishing academic and trade books. This position will expose the intern to a variety of tasks commonly expected of an entry-level editorial assistant in a scholarly or trade publishing house.

Candidates will be required to take and pass a keyboarding and proofreading test. The position requires meticulous attention to detail as well as a good command of English grammar and spelling. Macintosh computer skills and experience with Microsoft Word are helpful.

Because of the extensive training involved, this internship is offered with the expectation that the intern will work no fewer than ten hours per week and that the internship will continue for a minimum of two consecutive quarters. Extension of the internship for additional hours or additional quarters will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

The work covered by the internship will include as many of the following elements as time allows:

  1. Cleanup of manuscripts (preparation of manuscripts for the copyeditor, removal of extraneous formatting, application of Microsoft Word Styles);
  2. Entry of corrections (keying in author’s revisions from hard copy);
  3. Attendance at launch meeting(s);
  4. Filing CIP data application(s) with the Library of Congress;
  5. Checking permissions and images;
  6. Proofreading transcriptions against original documents;
  7. Proofreading jacket/cover copy, catalogue copy, advertising copy, and/or page proofs;
  8. Filing, photocopying, and general office work.

Interns will not have the opportunity to edit manuscripts.

This internship provides invaluable professional experience for students considering a career in publishing. For more information or to schedule a testing session, please contact Managing Editor Nancy Basmajian at (740) 593-1161 or basmajia@ohio.edu.

New Titles

Talkative Polity
Radio, Domination, and Citizenship in Uganda
Until they were banned in 2009, the radio debates called Ugandan People’s Parliaments gave common folk a forum to air their views. But how do people talk about politics in an authoritarian regime? The forms and parameters of such speech turn out to be more complex than a simple confrontation between an oppressive state and a liberal civil society.

Staging the Amistad
Three Sierra Leonean Plays
Staging the Amistad collects for the first time plays about the Amistad slave revolt by three of Sierra Leone’s most influential playwrights of the latter decades of the 20th century. Written and staged before and after the start of Sierra Leone’s decade-long conflict, they brought the Amistad rebellion to public consciousness.

The Bassett Women
Ann and Josie Bassett were members of Butch Cassidy’s inner circle, ranchers, and cattle rustlers. Based on interviews, written records, newspapers, and archives, The Bassett Women is an indelible portrait and one of the few credible accounts of early settlers on Colorado’s western slope, one of the last strongholds of the Old West.

Reflections
The American Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art
Reflections: The American Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art adds a novel and provocative element to the library of art museum collection catalogs, featuring selected works from the museum’s collection and accompanied by concise essays by scholars of art who reflect on respond to the distinctive aspects of each work.

Transported to Botany Bay
Class, National Identity, and the Literary Figure of the Australian Convict
In analyzing depictions of Australian convicts in novels, broadsides, and first-person accounts, Dorice Williams Elliott demonstrates how Britain linked class, race, and national identity at a key historical moment when it was still negotiating its relationship with its empire.