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Internships

Guidelines for Editorial Department Internship (English 491)

The editorial department intern will assist in the preparation of book manuscripts at the Ohio University Press, a not-for-profit scholarly press publishing academic and trade books. This position will expose the intern to a variety of tasks commonly expected of an entry-level editorial assistant in a scholarly or trade publishing house.

Candidates will be required to take and pass a keyboarding and proofreading test. The position requires meticulous attention to detail as well as a good command of English grammar and spelling. Macintosh computer skills and experience with Microsoft Word are helpful.

Because of the extensive training involved, this internship is offered with the expectation that the intern will work no fewer than ten hours per week and that the internship will continue for a minimum of two consecutive quarters. Extension of the internship for additional hours or additional quarters will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

The work covered by the internship will include as many of the following elements as time allows:

  1. Cleanup of manuscripts (preparation of manuscripts for the copyeditor, removal of extraneous formatting, application of Microsoft Word Styles);
  2. Entry of corrections (keying in author’s revisions from hard copy);
  3. Attendance at launch meeting(s);
  4. Filing CIP data application(s) with the Library of Congress;
  5. Checking permissions and images;
  6. Proofreading transcriptions against original documents;
  7. Proofreading jacket/cover copy, catalogue copy, advertising copy, and/or page proofs;
  8. Filing, photocopying, and general office work.

Interns will not have the opportunity to edit manuscripts.

This internship provides invaluable professional experience for students considering a career in publishing. For more information or to schedule a testing session, please contact Managing Editor Nancy Basmajian at (740) 593-1161 or basmajia@ohio.edu.

New Titles

Spirituality and the Writer
A Personal Inquiry
Today, the surprisingly elastic form of the memoir embraces subjects that include dying, illness, loss, relationships, and self-awareness. Writing to reveal the inner self—the pilgrimage into one’s spiritual and/or religious nature—is a primary calling.

Intrusive Beauty
Poems
In this powerful debut, Capista traverses earth and ether to yield poems that elucidate the space between one’s life and one’s livelihood. While its landscapes range from back-alley Baltimore to the Bitterroot Valley, this book remains close to unbidden beauty and its capacity to sway one’s vision of the world.

Technologies of Suspicion and the Ethics of Obligation in Political Asylum
Taking everyday practices and interactions as their focus, contributors draw on various theoretical perspectives to examine how tensions between humanitarianism and security are negotiated at the local level. They thus show how asylum seekers are produced as suspicious subjects by the very systems to which they appeal for protection.

Writing the Polish American Woman in Postwar Ethnic Fiction
Though often unnoticed by scholars of literature and history, Polish American women have for decades been fighting back against the patriarchy they encountered in America and the patriarchy that followed them from Poland.

Smoky, the Dog That Saved My Life
The Bill Wynne Story
World War II soldier Bill Wynne met Smoky while serving in New Guinea, where the dog, who was smaller than Wynne’s army boot, was found trying to scratch her way out of a foxhole. After he adopted her, she served as the squadron mascot and is credited as being the first therapy dog for the emotional support she provided the soldiers.