shopping_cart

The Jacksonian Conservatism of Rufus P. Ranney
The Politics and Jurisprudence of a Northern Democrat from the Age of Jackson to the Gilded Age

By David M. Gold

“Gold’s analysis of Ranney provides a great deal of insight into the ideological world of mid-nineteenth-century northern Democrats and shows how … sectional conflict, war, emancipation, and industrialization transformed ‘radical’ political positions into ‘conservative’ ones in the space of a generation.”

Austin Allen, University of Houston–Downtown

Ohio’s Rufus P. Ranney embodied many of the most intriguing social and political tensions of his time. He was an anticorporate campaigner who became John D. Rockefeller’s favorite lawyer. A student and law partner of abolitionist Benjamin F. Wade, Ranney acquired an antislavery reputation and recruited troops for the Union army; but as a Democratic candidate for governor he denied the power of Congress to restrict slavery in the territories, and during the Civil War and Reconstruction he condemned Republican policies.

Ranney was a key delegate at Ohio’s second constitutional convention and a two-time justice of the Ohio Supreme Court. He advocated equality and limited government as understood by radical Jacksonian Democrats. Scholarly discussions of Jacksonian jurisprudence have primarily focused on a handful of United States Supreme Court cases, but Ranney’s opinions, taken as a whole, outline a broader approach to judicial decision making.

A founder of the Ohio State Bar Association, Ranney was immensely influential but has been understudied until now. He left no private papers, even destroying his own correspondence. In The Jacksonian Conservatism of Rufus P. Ranney, David M. Gold works with the public record to reveal the contours of Ranney’s life and work. The result is a new look at how Jacksonian principles crossed the divide of the Civil War and became part of the fabric of American law and at how radical antebellum Democrats transformed themselves into Gilded Age conservatives.

David M. Gold received his law degree and doctorate in history from the Ohio State University. He is the author of numerous books and articles on legal and political history, including Democracy in Session: A History of the Ohio General Assembly and An Exemplary Whig: Edward Kent and the Whig Disposition in American Politics and Law.More info →

Order a print copy

Hardcover · $51.96 ·
Add to Cart

Retail price: $64.95 · Save 20% ($51.96)

Buy from a local bookstore

IndieBound

US and Canada only

Download an electronic copy

Amazon Kindle Store Barnes & Noble NOOK Google Play iBooks Store

Availability and price vary according to vendor.

Cover of The Jacksonian Conservatism of Rufus P. Ranney

Share    Facebook icon  Email icon

Requests

Desk Copy Examination Copy Review Copy

Permission to reprint
Permission to photocopy or include in a course pack via Copyright Clearance Center

Formats

Hardcover
978-0-8214-2234-2
Retail price: $64.95, S.
Release date: January 2017
256 pages · 6 × 9 in.
Rights:  World

Electronic
978-0-8214-4579-2
Release date: January 2017
256 pages
Rights:  World

Related Titles

Cover of 'Gibbons v. Ogden, Law, and Society in the Early Republic'

Gibbons v. Ogden, Law, and Society in the Early Republic
By Thomas H. Cox

Gibbons v. Ogden, Law, and Society in the Early Republic examines a landmark decision in American jurisprudence, the first Supreme Court case to deal with the thorny legal issue of interstate commerce. Decided in 1824, Gibbons v. Ogden arose out of litigation between owners of rival steamboat lines over passenger and freight routes between the neighboring states of New York and New Jersey.

Law · Legal and Constitutional History · History

Cover of 'The Paradox of Progress'

The Paradox of Progress
Economic Change, Individual Enterprise, and Political Culture in Michigan, 1837–1878
By Martin J. Hershock

Americans have long recognized the central importance of the nineteenth-century Republican party in preserving the Union, ending slavery, and opening the way for industrial capitalism.

History · American History · Ohio and Regional

Cover of 'The  History of Ohio Law'

The History of Ohio Law
By Michael Les Benedict and John F. Winkler

History of Ohio Law is a complete sourcebook on the origin and development of Ohio law and its relationship to society. A model for work in this field, it is the starting point for any investigation of the subject. In the two-volume The History of Ohio Law, distinguished legal historians, practicing Ohio attorneys, and judges present the history of Ohio law and the interaction between law and society in the state.

Legal and Constitutional History · American History, Midwest · Ohio and Regional

Cover of 'Democracy in Session'

Democracy in Session
A History of the Ohio General Assembly
By David M. Gold

For more than 200 years no institution has been more important to the development of the American democratic polity than the state legislature, yet no political institution has been so neglected by historians. Although more lawmaking takes place in the state capitals than in Washington D.C., scholars have lavished their attention on Congress, producing only a handful of histories of state legislatures.

Ohio and Regional · History · Legal and Constitutional History · Law