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Virginia Woolf
Reading the Renaissance

Edited by Sally Greene

“Greene’s anthology is a treasury of contemporary scholarship and insight about ‘the period Woolf loved best’ (208 n. 12). One might go so far as to say that it is a revenant of Judith Shakespeare who has now been given a scholarly dimension if not voice.”

Evelyn Haller, Doane College

“…Virginia Woolf: Reading the Renaissance is worth dissection and study, if only to apreciate fully what is perhaps the collection’s most notable achievement: the contrast and comparison of one visionary age and its artists with another.”

Rachael Holmes, Virginia Woolf Bulletin

The story of “Shakespeare’s sister” that Virginia Woolf tells in A Room of One’s Own has sparked interest in the question of the place of the woman writer in the Renaissance. By now, the process of recovering lost voices of early modern women is well under way. But Woolf’s engagement with the Renaissance went deeper than that question indicates, as important as it was. Her writing reveals a lifelong conversation with the literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, from the travel narratives of Hakluyt to the works of Donne, Milton, Montaigne, and of course Shakespeare.

The first collection of essays to explore Woolf’s Renaissance, Virginia Woolf: Reading the Renaissance reflects an important interdisciplinary development: contributors include Renaissance as well as twentieth–century specialists. Part of a larger movement to explore the intellectual currents shaping our literary and cultural inheritance, these essays speak to a community of readers that includes, in addition to Woolf and Renaissance scholars, anyone interested in the deep roots of modernism, women’s studies, or literary history itself.

Sally Greene is an independent scholar affiliated with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a frequent contributor to critical studies on Virginia Woolf.   More info →

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Hardcover
978-0-8214-1269-5
Retail price: $44.95, S.
Release date: June 1999
304 pages
Rights:  World

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