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The Decolonization of Africa

By David Birmingham

“This work is an excellent introduction to the topic…. [I]t deserves a place in all college and public libraries.”

Charles W. McClellan, Radford University

“I cannot rate this book more highly.”

Examiner.com

This bold, popularizing synthesis presents a readily accessible introduction to one of the major themes of twentieth-century world history. Between 1922, when self-government was restored to Egypt, and 1994, when nonracial democracy was achieved in South Africa, 54 new nations were established in Africa. Written within the parameters of African history, as opposed to imperial history, this study charts the processes of nationalism, liberation and independence that recast the political map of Africa in these years. Ranging from Algeria in the North, where a French colonial government used armed force to combat Algerian aspirations to home-rule, to the final overthrow of apartheid in the South, this is an authoritative survey that will be welcomed by all students tackling this complex and challenging topic.

David Birmingham lived in Switzerland from 1947 to 1954 as a child and returned there in the 1990s as a visiting historian. From 1980 to 2001 he held the chair of Modern History in the University of Kent at Canterbury in England. He is the author of many books, including Portugal and Africa.

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Paperback
978-0-8214-1153-7
Retail price: $14.95, S.
Release date: January 1996
117 pages
Rights: USA and dependencies

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