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Gunther Stuhlmann

Listed in: Fiction · Women Authors · Literary Fiction · American Literature · Anaïs Nin · Literary Studies

Cover of 'Waste of Timelessness and Other Early Stories'

Waste of Timelessness and Other Early Stories
By Anaïs Nin
· Introduction by Allison Pease
· Foreword by Gunther Stuhlmann

Written when Anaïs Nin was in her twenties and living in France, the stories collected in Waste of Timelessness contain many elements familiar to those who know her later work as well as revelatory, early clues to themes developed in those more mature stories and novels. Seeded with details remembered from childhood and from life in Paris, the wistful tales portray artists, writers, strangers who meet in the night, and above all, women and their desires.

Cover of 'Ladders to Fire'

Ladders to Fire
By Anaïs Nin
· Introduction by Benjamin Franklin V
· Foreword by Gunther Stuhlmann

Anaïs Nin’s Ladders to Fire interweaves the stories of several women, each emotionally inhibited in her own way: through self-doubt, fear, guilt, moral drift, and distrust. The novel follows their inner struggles to overcome these barriers to happiness and wholeness. The author’s own experiences, as recorded in her famous diaries, supplied the raw material for her fiction. It was her intuitive, experimental, and always original style that transformed one into the other.

Cover of 'Ladders to Fire'

Ladders to Fire
By Anaïs Nin
· Foreword by Gunther Stuhlmann

After struggling with her own press and printing her own works, Anaïs Nin succeeded in getting Ladders to Fire accepted and published in 1946. This recognition marked a milestone in her life and career. Admitted into the fellowship of American novelists, she maintained the individuality of her literary style.

Cover of 'House of Incest'

House of Incest
By Anaïs Nin
· Foreword by Gunther Stuhlmann

“The genesis of House of Incest was in the dream. The keeping of dreams was an important part of that exploration of the unconscious. But I discovered dreams in themselves, isolated, were not always interesting. Very few of them had the complete imagery and tension to arouse others’ interest. They were fragmented. The surrealists delighted in the image themselves. This was satisfying to the painters and to the film-makers.

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