Ohio University Press is the largest university press in Ohio. With more than 1,000 books in print, the Press publishes between 40 and 50 books each year by authors in the United States and around the world. Some of our books have wide appeal as university texts and regional classics, while others make available the results of peer-reviewed and often groundbreaking research in the humanities and social sciences. Many of our most distinguished and attractive books are made possible by support from generous individuals and institutions.

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We welcome inquiries about sponsorship of individual books and series, contributions to our general endowment, and other funding opportunities and partnerships. Contact Gillian Berchowitz, Director, at berchowi@ohio.edu or 740-593-1157 with any inquiries about supporting the Press.

How to Support Ohio University Press


New Titles

Buying Time
Debt and Mobility in the Western Indian Ocean
In Buying Time, Thomas F. McDow synthesizes Indian Ocean, Middle Eastern, and East African studies as well as economic and social history to explain how, in the nineteenth century, credit, mobility, and kinship knit together a vast interconnected Indian Ocean region.


Peoples of the Inland Sea
Native Americans and Newcomers in the Great Lakes Region, 1600–1870
Diverse in their languages and customs, the Native American peoples of the Great Lakes region—the Miamis, Ho-Chunks, Potawatomis, Ojibwas, and many others—shared a tumultuous history. In the colonial era their rich homeland became a target of imperial ambition and an invasion zone for European diseases, technologies, beliefs, and colonists.


Count the Wings
The Life and Art of Charley Harper
When you look at a bird, do you see feathers and a beak? Or do you see circles and triangles? Artist Charley Harper spent his life reducing subjects to their simplest forms, their basic lines and shapes. This resulted in what he called minimal realism and the style that would become easily recognized as Charley Harper’s.


Hip-Hop in Africa
Prophets of the City and Dustyfoot Philosophers
Throughout Africa, artists use hip-hop both to describe their lives and to create shared spaces for uncensored social commentary, feminist challenges to patriarchy, and resistance against state institutions, while at the same time engaging with the global hip-hop community.


Lyrical Liberators
The American Antislavery Movement in Verse, 1831–1865
Before Black Lives Matter and Hamilton, there were abolitionist poets. In Lyrical Liberators, Monica Pelaez draws on unprecedented archival research to recover, collect, and annotate works by critically acclaimed writers, commercially successful scribes, and minority voices including those of African Americans and women.