Alexander Robey Shepherd · The Man Who Built the Nation’s Capital · By John P. Richardson · Foreword by Tony Williams

With Alexander Robey Shepherd, John P. Richardson gives us the first full-length biography of his subject, who as Washington, D.C.’s, public works czar (1871–74) built the infrastructure of the nation’s capital in a few frenetic years after the Civil War. The story of Shepherd is also the story of his hometown after that cataclysm, which left the city with churned-up streets, stripped of its trees, and exhausted.

Cover of 'Alexander Robey Shepherd'

Mariemont · A Pictorial History of a Model Town · By Millard F. Rogers Jr.

Located near Cincinnati, Mariemont was designed as a self-sufficient town, its inspiration derived from the English Garden City and concepts developed in the early twentieth century. In 2007, Mariemont earned National Historic Landmark status from the Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior.

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The AIA Guide to Columbus · By Jeffrey T. Darbee and Nancy A. Recchie

Columbus, the largest city in Ohio, has, since its founding in 1812, been home to many impressive architectural landmarks. The AIA Guide to Columbus, produced by the Columbus Architecture Foundation, highlights the significant buildings and neighborhoods in the Columbus metropolitan area. Skillfully blending architectural interest with historic significance, The AIA Guide to Columbus documents approximately 160 buildings and building groups and is organized geographically.

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Paris on the Potomac · The French Influence on the Architecture and Art of Washington, D.C. · Edited by Cynthia R. Field, Isabelle Gournay, and Thomas P. Somma

In 1910 John Merven Carrère, a Paris-trained American architect, wrote, “Learning from Paris made Washington outstanding among American cities.” The five essays in Paris on the Potomac explore aspects of this influence on the artistic and architectural environment of Washington, D.C., which continued long after the well-known contributions of Peter Charles L’Enfant, the transplanted French military officer who designed the city’s plan.

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Architecture in Cincinnati · An Illustrated History of Designing and Building an American City · By Sue Ann Painter · Photography by Alice Weston

Cincinnati was the first “great” city founded after American independence, and its prodigious growth reflected the rise of the new nation. Its architecture is a testament to that growth and to the importance of the city itself. Architecture in Cincinnati: An Illustrated History of Designing and Building an American City traces the city's development from the first town plans of the 1780s to the city that it is today, renowned for its dramatic architectural achievements.

Cover of 'Architecture in Cincinnati'