Native Life in South Africa · Before and Since the European War and the Boer Rebellion · By Sol T. Plaatje · Introduction by Brian Willan · Foreword by Bessie Head

First published in 1916 and one of South Africa's great political books, Native Life in South Africa was first and foremost a response to the Native's Land Act of 1913, and was written by one of the most gifted and influential writers and journalists of his generation. Sol T. Plaatje provides an account of the origins of this crucially important piece of legislation and a devastating description of its immediate effects.



Learning from Robben Island · Govan Mbeki's Prison Writings · By Govan Mbeki · Introduction by Colin Bundy · Foreword by Harry Gwala

“South Africa has jailed so many gifted men and women that there already exists a sizeable body of prison writing…The essays by Govan Mbeki which comprise this book add to this distinguished list. Yet they differ in important respects from all others: they were written, circulated and preserved in prison. They were never intended for publication but to be read by other prisoners; their aim is not to share an experience but to educate politically. They are remarkable documents.

Cover of 'Learning from Robben Island'


Penetration and Protest in Tanzania · Impact of World Economy on the Pare, 1860–1960 · By Isaria N. Kimambo

The originality of this study of rural transformation stems from the way in which Professor Kimambo has used the oral tradition to reveal the history of the impact of the world economy in northeastern Tanzania. First under the pressures of commodity trade, and later under German and British imperialism, the peasant producers of this region were forced into participation in capitalist production. These partial changes destroyed the Pare’s balanced subsistence structure.

Cover of 'Penetration and Protest in Tanzania'


So Vast So Beautiful A Land · Louisiana and the Purchase · By Marshall Sprague

In 1803, the American minister to Paris, Robert Livingston, received a startling offer. For months, he had been trying to buy New Orleans and West Florida for the United States, with notably little success, and now suddenly Napoleon wanted to sell everything, the entire Louisiana territory, nearly a million square miles stretching from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, from the Mississippi to the Continental Divid.

Cover of 'So Vast So Beautiful A Land'


Control and Crisis in Colonial Kenya · The Dialectic of Domination · By Bruce Berman

This history of the political economy of Kenya is the first full length study of the development of the colonial state in Africa. Professor Berman argues that the colonial state was shaped by the contradictions between maintaining effective political control with limited coercive force and ensuring the profitable articulation of metropolitan and settler capitalism with African societies.

Cover of 'Control and Crisis in Colonial Kenya'


Mafeking Diary · A Black Man's View of a White Man's War · By Sol T. Plaatje · Edited by John Comaroff

“Sol Plaatje's Mafeking Diary is a document of enduring importance and fascination. The product of a young black South African court interpreter, just turned 23 years old when he started writing, it opens an entirely new vista on the famous Siege of Mafeking.

Cover of 'Mafeking Diary'


Pilgrimage · A Journey Through Colorado's History and Culture · By Stephen J. May

From Cripple Creek to the Santa Fe Trail, Mesa Verde to the mountain towns of Leadville and Steamboat Springs, Colorado provides travelers and natives with a spectrum of beauty that is both awesome and austere. Drawn by the lingering mystique of conquistadores and wild, hot-blooded boom-town mining camps, Stephen May takes us on a physical and spiritual journey, through a Colorado alive with a sense of its rich frontier history.

Cover of 'Pilgrimage'


Knight of the Road · The Life of Highwayman Ham White · By Mark Dugan

The American public has long been fascinated by the Old West and the so–called heroes that it produced. Even before the days of Jesse James, Billy the Kid, and the dime novel, the public’s heroes have always been somewhat tainted. Numerous stories of chivalry and gallantry have been accredited to outlaws, but all tales have been based upon folklore and legends. Mark Dugan, however, gives us a bona fide American Robin Hood with Ham White.

Cover of 'Knight of the Road'


Communism, Religion, and Revolt in Banten in the Early Twentieth Century · By Michael Williams

Twice in this century popular revolts against colonial rule have occured in the Banten district of West Java. These revolts, conducted largely under an Islamic leadership, also proclaimed themselves Communist. Islamic Communism is seemingly a paradox. This is especially the case when one considers that probably no religion has proved more resistant to Communist ideology than Islam.

Cover of 'Communism, Religion, and Revolt in Banten in the Early Twentieth Century'


Ghost Towns of the American West · By Robert Silverberg

The story of the American mining frontier can be traced in the ghost towns — from the camps of California's forty-niners to the twentieth-century ruins in the Nevada desert. They mark an epoch of high adventure, of quick wealth and quicker poverty, of gambling and gun-slinging and hell-raising.

Cover of 'Ghost Towns of the American West'


Way’s Steam Towboat Directory · By Frederick Way Jr. and Joseph W. Rutter

After the initial release in 1983 of Way’s Packet Directory, 1848–1983, the demand was enormous for a similar treatment of the steam towboats that once populated the Mississippi River System. Captain Frederick Way, Jr.,

Cover of 'Way’s Steam Towboat Directory'


Quivira · Europeans in the region of the Santa Fe Trail, 1540–1820 · By William Brandon

New Mexico was a frontier to the wilderness, for Europeans, for almost three hundred years. No other frontier history in the area of what is now the United States can support such continuity, or even come close. It was the outside edge of the northern borderlands of New Spain, that later became the northern borderlands of Mexico. It was the western rim of the world for the French explorers and fur traders in the Mississippi valley and for the English who followed them there.

Cover of 'Quivira'


George Kennan and the American-Russian Relationship, 1865–1924 · By Frederick F. Travis

George Kennan’s career as a specialist on Russian affairs began in 1865, with his first journey to the Russian empire. A twenty-year-old telegraphic engineer at the time, he was a member of the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition, a now virtually unknown but nevertheless remarkable nineteenth-century adventure story.

Cover of 'George Kennan and the American-Russian Relationship, 1865–1924'


Vietnam Since the Fall of Saigon · By William J. Duiker

When North Vietnamese troops occupied Saigon at the end of April 1975, their leaders in Hanoi faced the future with pride and confidence. Almost fifteen years later, the euphoria has given way to sober realism. Since the end of the war, the Communist regime has faced an almost uninterrupted series of difficulties including sluggish economic growth at home and a costly occupation of neighboring Cambodia.



Military Ascendancy and Political Culture · A Study of Indonesia's Golkar · By Leo Suryadinata

Most of the earlier studies on the Indonesian political party, Golkar, tend to view the organization solely as an electoral machine used by the military to legitimize its power. However, this study is different in that it considers Golkar less an electoral machine and more as a political organization which inherited the political traditions of the nominal Muslim parties and the Javanese governing elite pre-1965, before the inauguration of Indonesia’s New Order.

Cover of 'Military Ascendancy and Political Culture'