An Invisible Rope · Portraits of Czesław Miłosz · Edited by Cynthia L. Haven

Czesław Miłosz (1911–2004) often seemed austere and forbidding to Americans, but those who got to know him found him warm, witty, and endlessly enriching. An Invisible Rope: Portraits of Czesław Miłosz presents a collection of remembrances from his colleagues, his students, and his fellow writers and poets in America and Poland. Miłosz’s oeuvre is complex, rooted in twentieth-century eastern European history.

Cover of 'An Invisible Rope'


Holy Week · A Novel of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising · By Jerzy Andrzejewski · Introduction by Oscar E. Swan · Foreword by Jan T. Gross

At the height of the Nazi extermination campaign in the Warsaw Ghetto, a young Jewish woman, Irena, seeks the protection of her former lover, a young architect, Jan Malecki. By taking her in, he puts his own life and the safety of his family at risk.

Cover of 'Holy Week'


No Peace, No War · An Anthropology of Contemporary Armed Conflicts · Edited by Paul Richards

A rash of small wars erupted after the Cold War ended in Africa, the Balkans, and other parts of the former communist world. The wars were in “inter-zones,” the spaces left where weak states had withdrawn or collapsed. Consequently the debate over what constitutes war has returned to basics. No Peace, No War departs from the usual analysis that considers the new wars mindless mass actions to offer the paradoxical idea that to understand war one must deny war special status.

Cover of 'No Peace, No War'


Midwives of the Revolution · Female Bolsheviks and Women Workers in 1917 · By Jane McDermid and Anna Hillyar

The Bolshevik seizure of power in 1917 and the ensuing communist regime have often been portrayed as a man’s revolution, with women as bystanders or even victims. Midwives of the Revolution examines the powerful contribution made by women to the overthrow of tsarism in 1917 and their importance in the formative years of communism in Russia.

Cover of 'Midwives of the Revolution'


George Kennan and the American-Russian Relationship, 1865–1924 · By Frederick F. Travis

George Kennan’s career as a specialist on Russian affairs began in 1865, with his first journey to the Russian empire. A twenty-year-old telegraphic engineer at the time, he was a member of the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition, a now virtually unknown but nevertheless remarkable nineteenth-century adventure story.

Cover of 'George Kennan and the American-Russian Relationship, 1865–1924'