Trapeze · The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1947–1955 · By Anaïs Nin · Edited by Paul Herron · Introduction by Benjamin Franklin V · Preface by Paul Herron

Anaïs Nin made her reputation through publication of her edited diaries and the carefully constructed persona they presented. It was not until decades later, when the diaries were published in their unexpurgated form, that the world began to learn the full details of Nin’s fascinating life and the emotional and literary high-wire acts she committed both in documenting it and in defying the mores of 1950s America.

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Once I Too Had Wings · The Journals of Emma Bell Miles, 1908–1918 · By Emma Bell Miles · Edited by Steven Cox · Foreword by Elizabeth S. D. Engelhardt

Previously examined only by a handful of scholars, the journals of Emma Bell Miles (1879–1919) contain poignant and incisive accounts of nature and a woman’s perspective on love and marriage, death customs, child raising, medical care, and subsistence on the land in southern Appalachia in the early twentieth century.

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491 Days · Prisoner Number 1323/69 · By Winnie Madikizela-Mandela · Foreword by Ahmed Kathrada

On a freezing winter’s night, a few hours before dawn on May 12, 1969, South African security police stormed the Soweto home of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, activist and wife of the imprisoned Nelson Mandela, and arrested her in the presence of her two young daughters, then aged nine and ten. Rounded up in a group of other antiapartheid activists under Section 6 of the Terrorism Act, designed for the security police to hold and interrogate people for as long as they wanted, she was taken away.

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Mirages · The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1939–1947 · By Anaïs Nin · Edited by Paul Herron · Introduction by Kim Krizan · Preface by Paul Herron

Mirages opens at the dawn of World War II, when Anaïs Nin fled Paris, where she lived for fifteen years with her husband, banker Hugh Guiler, and ends in 1947 when she meets the man who would be “the One,” the lover who would satisfy her insatiable hunger for connection. In the middle looms a period Nin describes as “hell,” during which she experiences a kind of erotic madness, a delirium that fuels her search for love.

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Hero of the Angry Sky · The World War I Diary and Letters of David S. Ingalls, America’s First Naval Ace · By David S. Ingalls · Edited by Geoffrey L. Rossano · Foreword by William F. Trimble

Draws on the unpublished diaries, correspondence, informal memoir, and other personal documents of the U.S. Navy’s only flying “ace” of World War I to tell his unique story.

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The Untried Life · The Twenty-Ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the Civil War · By James T. Fritsch

Told in unflinching detail, this is the story of the Twenty-Ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, also known as the Giddings Regiment or the Abolition Regiment, after its founder, radical abolitionist Congressman J. R. Giddings. The men who enlisted in the Twenty- Ninth OVI were, according to its lore, handpicked to ensure each was as pure in his antislavery beliefs as its founder.

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Prosperity Far Distant · The Journal of an American Farmer, 1933–1934 · By Charles M. Wiltse · Edited by Michael J. Birkner

Fresh from receiving a doctorate from Cornell University in 1933, but unable to find work, Charles M. Wiltse joined his parents on the small farm they had recently purchased in southern Ohio. There, the Wiltses scratched out a living selling eggs, corn, and other farm goods at prices that were barely enough to keep the farm intact. In wry and often affecting prose, Wiltse recorded a year in the life of this quintessentially American place during the Great Depression.

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Wartime in Burma · A Diary, January to June 1942 · By Theippan Maung Wa · Edited by L. E. Bagshawe and Anna J. Allott

This diary, begun after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and covering the invasion of Burma up to June 1942, is a moving account of the dilemmas faced by the well-loved and prolific Burmese author Theippan Maung Wa (a pseudonym of U Sein Tin) and his family. At the time of the Japanese invasion, U Sein Tin was deputy secretary in the Ministry of Home and Defense Affairs.

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Soliloquy of a Farmer’s Wife · The Diary of Annie Elliott Perrin · Edited by Dale B. J. Randall

Diary of a Geneva, Ohio, farmer’s wife, Annie Perrin, who wrote during the final battles, climax, and close of World War I.

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Lionel Sotheby’s Great War · Diaries and Letters from the Western Front · By Lionel Sotheby · Edited by Donald C. Richter · Introduction by Donald C. Richter · Foreword by Peter H. Liddle

The “butterfly” that emerged in World War I trench warfare in 1915 aspired to kill: “I cannot explain,” the diary continues. “It comes unseen and makes you oblivious of almost everything at times, save one intense desire to kill, kill, kill, the Germans.” Lionel Sotheby’s diary and letters are a compelling first-person account of the harrowing experiences of the young British lieutenant at the Western Front. His writing reveals constant peril, hourly discomfort, and gruesome injuries.

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An African American in South Africa · The Travel Notes of Ralph J. Bunche 28 September 1937–1 January 1938 · By Ralph Bunche · Edited by Robert R. Edgar

Ralph Bunche, who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950, traveled to South Africa for three months in 1937. His notes, which have been skillfully compiled and annotated by historian Robert R. Edgar, provide unique insights on a segregated society.

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Buckeye Rovers in the Gold Rush · An Edition of Two Diaries · By H. Lee Scamehorn · Edited by Edwin P. Banks and Jamie Lytle-Webb

When “California Fever” raced through southeastern Ohio in the spring of 1849, a number of residents of Athens County organized a cooperative venture for traveling overland to the mines. Known as the “Buckeye Rovers,” the company began its trip westward in early April. The Buckeye Rovers, along with thousands who traveled the overland route to California, endured numerous hardships and the seemingly constant threat of attacks from hostile Indians.

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Survival On a Westward Trek, 1858–1859 · The John Jones Overlanders · By Dwight L. Smith

When gold was discovered in the Fraser River country of British Columbia in the 1850s, St. Paul, Minnesota became the departure point for the plunge westward, as was St. Louis for the American gold rushes. Minnesotans soon caught the fever. Nine young men set out in July of 1858 for the goldfields of British Columbia.

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Breaking With Burr · Harman Blennerhassett’s Journal, 1807 · By Harman Blennerhassett · Edited by Raymond E. Fitch

First complete publication, newly transcribed from the manuscript, of Harman Blennerhassett’s private diary of his detention pending his trial for treason.

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Life, Journals and Correspondence of Rev. Manasseh Cutler, L L. D. · By Julia P. Cutler and William P. Cutler

A fascinating description of the processes that laid the foundations for civilization in the Ohio Valley.

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