Sales and Celebrations · Retailing and Regional Identity in Western New York State, 1920–1940 · By Sarah Elvins

Between the two world wars, the retail world experienced tremendous changes. New forms of competition, expanded networks of communication and transportation, and the proliferation of manufactured goods posed challenges to department store and small shopkeeper alike. In western New York, and in Buffalo and Rochester in particular, retailers were a crucial part of urban life, acting as cultural brokers and civic leaders. They were also cultivators of area pride.

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Red, White, Black, and Blue · A Dual Memoir of Race and Class in Appalachia · By William M. Drennen Jr. and Kojo (William T.) Jones Jr. · Edited by Dolores Johnson

A groundbreaking approach to studying not only cultural linguistics but also the cultural heritage of a historic time and place in America. It gives witness to the issues of race and class inherent in the way we write, speak, and think.

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The Exile Mission · The Polish Political Diaspora and Polish Americans, 1939–1956 · By Anna D. Jaroszyńska-Kirchmann

At midcentury, two distinct Polish immigrant groups—those Polish Americans who were descendants of economic immigrants from the turn of the twentieth century and the Polish political refugees who chose exile after World War II and the communist takeover in Poland—faced an uneasy challenge to reconcile their concepts of responsibility toward the homeland. The new arrivals did not consider themselves simply as immigrants, but rather as members of the special category of political refugees.

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Ohio University, 1804–2004 · The Spirit of a Singular Place · By Betty Hollow

Lively narrative depicting the historical, academic, and cultural events that shaped one of Ohio’s premier universities.

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The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume VII · Taft Papers on League of Nations · Edited by Frank X. Gerrity

Eager to turn the congressional election of 1918 into a confirmation of his foreign policy, President Woodrow Wilson was criticized for abandoning the spirit of the popular slogan “Politics adjourned!” His predecessor, William Howard Taft, found Wilson difficult to deal with and took issue with his version of the League of Nations, which Taft felt was inferior to the model proposed by the League to Enforce Peace.

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American Pantheon · Sculptural and Artistic Decoration of the United States Capitol · Edited by Donald R. Kennon and Thomas P. Somma

Like the ancient Roman Pantheon, the U.S. Capitol was designed by its political and aesthetic arbiters to memorialize the virtues, events, and persons most representative of the nation's ideals—an attempt to raise a particular version of the nation's founding to the level of myth. American Pantheon examines the influences upon not only those virtues and persons selected for inclusion in the American pantheon, but also those excluded.

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The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume III · Presidential Addresses and State Papers · Edited by David H. Burton

The third volume of The Collected Works of William Howard Taft imparts an appreciation of the range of the twenty-seventh president’s interests. Beginning with his inaugural address and concluding with a detailed exposition of governmental expenses and needed economies, President William Howard Taft showed himself willing to tackle the routine as well as the rarified responsibilities of executive rule.

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The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume II · Political Issues and Outlooks: Speeches Delivered Between August 1908 and February 1909 · Edited by David H. Burton

The second volume of The Collected Works of William Howard Taft is dedicated to the speeches and writings that displayed his thinking in the autumn of 1908 and the following winter. At this time he was campaigning for the presidency against the well-known William Jennings Bryan, and in Taft’s writings is evidence of the contrast in style between Taft and Bryan and between Taft and his predecessor, Teddy Roosevelt. as well.

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The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume I · Four Aspects of Civic Duty & Present Day Problems · Edited by David H. Burton and A. E. Campbell

The inaugural volume of The Collected Works of William Howard Taft is composed of two of his earliest books, Four Aspects of Civic Duty and Present Day Problems.

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The Paradox of Progress · Economic Change, Individual Enterprise, and Political Culture in Michigan, 1837–1878 · By Martin J. Hershock

Americans have long recognized the central importance of the nineteenth-century Republican party in preserving the Union, ending slavery, and opening the way for industrial capitalism.

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Profiles of Ohio Women, 1803–2003 · By Jacqueline Jones Royster

Developed by the Ohio Bicentennial Commission's Advisory Council on Women, this collection profiles a few of the many women who have left their imprint on the state, nation, world, and even outer space.

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The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, Volume VI · The President and His Powers and The United States and Peace · Edited by David H. Burton, W. Carey McWilliams, and Frank X. Gerrity

Volume VI of The Collected Works of William Howard Taft follows the career of William Howard Taft upon his leaving the White House. It consists of two short publications from 1914 and 1915. The first, The President and His Powers, is based on a series of lectures delivered at Columbia University and draws on Taft’s experience in the presidency and the executive branch.

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Seeking the One Great Remedy · Francis George Shaw and Nineteenth-Century Reform · By Lorien Foote

A radical abolitionist and early feminist, Francis George Shaw (1809–1882) was a prominent figure in American reform and intellectual circles for five decades. He rejected capitalism in favor of a popular utopian socialist movement; during the Civil War and Reconstruction, he applied his radical principles to the Northern war effort and to freedmen's organizations. A partnership with Henry George in the late 1870s provided an international audience for Shaw's alternative vision of society.

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Traitors and True Poles · Narrating a Polish-American Identity, 1880–1939 · By Karen Majewski

During Poland’s century-long partition and in the interwar period of Poland's reemergence as a state, Polish writers on both sides of the ocean shared a preoccupation with national identity. Polish-American immigrant writers revealed their persistent, passionate engagement with these issues, as they used their work to define and consolidate an essentially transnational ethnic identity that was both tied to Poland and independent of it.

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From Blackjacks to Briefcases · A History of Commercialized Strikebreaking and Unionbusting in the United States · By Robert Michael Smith

From the beginning of the Industrial Age and continuing into the twenty-first century, companies faced with militant workers and organizers have often turned to agencies that specialized in ending strikes and breaking unions. Although their secretive nature has made it difficult to fully explore the history of this industry, From Blackjacks to Briefcases does just that.

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