The Series in Law, Society, and Politics in the Midwest publishes works that emphasize major historical and contemporary issues in the greater Midwestern region. Books in the series engage a wide range of sources and topics that consider how the law shapes and influences politics and society in the United States.


Editors

Paul Finkelman, President William McKinley
Distinguished Professor of Law
Albany Law School
80 New Scotland Ave
Ablany, NY 12208


L. Diane Barnes
Professor
Department of History
Youngstown State University
One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555

The Jacksonian Conservatism of Rufus P. Ranney · The Politics and Jurisprudence of a Northern Democrat from the Age of Jackson to the Gilded Age

By David M. Gold

In The Jacksonian Conservatism of Rufus P. Ranney, David M. Gold works with the public record to reveal the contours of the life and work of one of Ohio’s most intriguing legal figures. The result is a new look at how Jacksonian principles crossed the divide of the Civil War and became part of the fabric of American law and at how radical antebellum Democrats transformed themselves into Gilded Age conservatives.



Surveillance and Spies in the Civil War · Exposing Confederate Conspiracies in America’s Heartland

By Stephen E. Towne

Surveillance and Spies in the Civil War represents pathbreaking research on the rise of U.S. Army intelligence operations in the Midwest during the American Civil War and counters long-standing assumptions about Northern politics and society.


Degrees of Allegiance · Harassment and Loyalty in Missouri's German-American Community during World War I

By Petra DeWitt


Justice and Legal Change on the Shores of Lake Erie · A History of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio

Edited by Paul Finkelman and Roberta Sue Alexander

Explores the many ways that the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio has affected the region, the nation, the development of American law, and American politics.


In the antebellum Midwest, Americans looked to the law, and specifically to the jury, to navigate the uncertain terrain of a rapidly changing society. During this formative era of American law, the jury served as the most visible connector between law and society. Through an analysis of the composition of grand and trial juries and an examination of their courtroom experiences, Stacy Pratt McDermott demonstrates how central the law was for people who lived in Abraham Lincoln’s America.



Democracy in Session · A History of the Ohio General Assembly

By David M. Gold


No Winners Here Tonight · Race, Politics, and Geography in One of the Country’s Busiest Death Penalty States

By Andrew Welsh-Huggins









A Place of Recourse · A History of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Ohio, 1803–2003

By Roberta Sue Alexander



History of Ohio Law is a complete sourcebook on the origin and development of Ohio law and its relationship to society. A model for work in this field, it is the starting point for any investigation of the subject. In the two-volume The History of Ohio Law, distinguished legal historians, practicing Ohio attorneys, and judges present the history of Ohio law and the interaction between law and society in the state.