This series of publications on Southeast Asia is designed to present significant research, translation, and opinion to area specialists and to a wide community of persons interested in world affairs. The editors seek manuscripts of quality in a wide range of disciplines.The editor works closely with authors to produce a high-quality book. The series is distributed worldwide.

All books in the series are published in association with the Center for International Studies at Ohio University.


Editors

Gillian Berchowitz, Executive Editor
Research in International Studies
Ohio University Press

Elizabeth F. Collins
Consultant

William H. Frederick
Consultant

Passionate Revolutions · The Media and the Rise and Fall of the Marcos Regime

By Talitha Espiritu

In the last three decades, the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos has commanded the close scrutiny of scholars. These studies have focused on the political repression, human rights abuses, debt-driven growth model, and crony capitalism that defined Marcos’ so-called Democratic Revolution in the Philippines. But the relationship between the media and the regime’s public culture remains underexplored.


Camp Life Is Paradise for Freddy · A Childhood in the Dutch East Indies, 1933–1946

By Fred Lanzing · Translation by Marjolijn de Jager · Introduction by William H. Frederick

“Children see and hear what is there; adults see and hear what they are expected to and mainly remember what they think they ought to remember,” David Lowenthal wrote in The Past Is a Foreign Country. It is on this fraught foundation that Fred Lanzing builds this memoir of his childhood in a Japanese internment camp for Dutch colonialists in the East Indies during the World War II.


Subversive Lives · A Family Memoir of the Marcos Years

By Susan F. Quimpo and Nathan Gilbert Quimpo · Foreword by Vicente L. Rafael

From the 1960s to the 1990s, seven members of the Quimpo family dedicated themselves to the anti-Marcos resistance in the Philippines, sometimes at profound personal cost. In this unprecedented memoir, eight siblings (plus one by marriage) tell their remarkable stories in individually authored chapters that comprise a family saga of revolution, persistence, and, ultimately, vindication, even as easy resolution eluded their struggles.


Women in the Shadows · Gender, Puppets, and the Power of Tradition in Bali

By Jennifer Goodlander

Wayang kulit, or shadow puppetry, connects a mythic past to the present through public ritual performance and is one of most important performance traditions in Bali. The dalang, or puppeteer, is revered in Balinese society as a teacher and spiritual leader. Recently, women have begun to study and perform in this traditionally male role, an innovation that has triggered resistance and controversy.


Viet Nam · Tradition and Change

By Hữu Ngọc · Edited by Lady Borton and Elizabeth F. Collins

An accessible and erudite primer on Vietnamese history and culture from one of Việt Nam’s finest minds.


Gongs and Pop Songs · Sounding Minangkabau in Indonesia

By Jennifer A. Fraser

Scholarship on the musical traditions of Indonesia has long focused on practices from Java and Bali, including famed gamelan traditions, at the expense of the wide diversity of other musical forms within the archipelago. Jennifer A. Fraser counters this tendency by exploring a little-known gong tradition from Sumatra called talempong, long associated with people who identify themselves as Minangkabau.









Silenced Voices · Uncovering a Family’s Colonial History in Indonesia

By Inez Hollander



BitterSweet · The Memoir of a Chinese Indonesian Family in the Twentieth Century

By Stuart Pearson


Being “Dutch” in the Indies · A History of Creolisation and Empire, 1500–1920

By Ulbe Bosma and Remco Raben · Translation by Wendie Shaffer

Being “Dutch” in the Indies portrays Dutch colonial territories in Asia not as mere societies under foreign occupation but rather as a “Creole empire.” In telling the story of the Creole empire, the authors draw on government archives, newspapers, and literary works as well as genealogical studies that follow the fortunes of individual families over several generations. They also critically analyze theories relating to culturally and racially mixed communities.




Southeast Asian Lives · Personal Narratives and Historical Experience

Edited by Roxana Waterson






Tensions of Empire · Japan and Southeast Asia in the Colonial and Postcolonial World

By Ken’ichi Goto · Edited by Paul H. Kratoska

Beginning with the closing decade of European colonial rule in Southeast Asia and covering the wartime Japanese empire and its postwar disintegration, Tensions of Empire focuses on the Japanese in Southeast Asia, Indonesians in Japan, and the legacy of the war in Southeast Asia. It also examines Japanese perceptions of Southeast Asia and the lingering ambivalence toward Japanese involvement in Asia and toward the war in particular.


At a watershed moment in the scholarly approach to the history of this important region, New Terrains in Southeast Asian History captures the richness and diversity of historical discourse among Southeast Asian scholars. Through the perspectives of scholars who live and work within the region, the book offers readers a rare opportunity to enter into the world of Southeast Asian historiography.


Surabaya, City of Work · A Socioeconomic History, 1900–2000

By Howard Dick

Surabaya is Indonesia's second largest city but is not well known to the outside world. Yet in 1900, Surabaya was a bigger city than Jakarta and one of the main commercial centers of Asia. Collapse of sugar exports during the 1930s depression, followed by the Japanese occupation, revolution, and independence, brought on a long period of stagnation and retreat from the international economy.



The culture of television in Indonesia began with its establishment in 1962 as a public broadcasting service. From that time, through the deregulation of television broadcasting in 1990 and the establishment of commercial channels, television can be understood, Philip Kitley argues, as a part of the New Order's national culture project, designed to legitimate an idealized Indonesian national cultural identity.