Series editors John A. Booth and Patricia Bayer Richard invite proposals on key topics of interest to area specialists and a wider audience about Latin America. The Ohio University Press produces well-edited and accessibly written books by both new and established authors. The editors seek manuscripts that elucidate national or regional history and contemporary life, politics, democratization, civil conflict, the environment, crime and corruption, violence, women’s rights and status, gender identity, poverty, economics, race and ethnicity, and religion.

All books in the series are published in association with the Center for International Studies at Ohio University.

For details on submitting a proposal, see the Submission Guidelines page. Inquiries should be directed to the series editors.


Editors

Gillian Berchowitz, Executive Editor
Research in International Studies
Ohio University Press

John A. Booth, Series Editor
Research in International Studies
Latin America Studies
john.booth@unt.edu

Patricia Bayer Richard, Series Editor
Research in International Studies
Latin America Studies
richard@ohio.edu

Captured Peace · Elites and Peacebuilding in El Salvador

By Christine J. Wade

The most comprehensive, up-to-date book on Salvadoran politics of the last twenty-five years.




When Sugar Ruled · Economy and Society in Northwestern Argentina, Tucumán, 1876–1916

By Patricia Juarez–Dappe



Madness in Buenos Aires · Patients, Psychiatrists and the Argentine State, 1880–1983

By Jonathan Ablard





Feminism and the Legacy of Revolution · Nicaragua, El Salvador, Chiapas

By Karen Kampwirth

In many Latin American countries, guerrilla struggle and feminism have been linked in surprising ways. Women were mobilized by the thousands to promote revolutionary agendas that had little to do with increasing gender equality. They ended up creating a uniquely Latin American version of feminism that combined revolutionary goals of economic equality and social justice with typically feminist aims of equality, nonviolence, and reproductive rights.



Writing Women in Central America · Gender and the Fictionalization of History

By Laura Barbas-Rhoden

What is the relationship between history and fiction in a place with a contentious past? And of what concern is gender in the telling of stories about that past? Writing Women in Central America explores these questions as it considers key Central American texts. This study analyzes how authors appropriate history to confront the rhetoric of the state, global economic powers, and even dissident groups within their own cultures.







Terror in the Countryside · Campesino Responses to Political Violence in Guatemala, 1954–1985

By Rachel A. May

The key to democratization lies within the experience of the popular movements. Those who engaged in the popular struggle in Guatemala have a deep understanding of substantive democratic behavior, and the experience of Guatemala's civil society should be the cornerstone for building a meaningful formal democracy. In Terror in the Countryside Rachel May offers an in-depth examination of the relationship between political violence and civil society.



For forty years the Cuban Revolution has been at the forefront of American public opinion, yet few are knowledgeable about the history of its enemies and the responsibility of the U.S. government in organizing and sustaining the Cuban counterrevolution.




Peasants in Arms · War and Peace in the Mountains of Nicaragua, 1979–1994

By Lynn Horton

Drawing on testimonies from contra collaborators and ex-combatants, as well as pro-Sandinista peasants, this book presents a dynamic account of the growing divisions between peasants from the area of Quilalí who took up arms in defense of revolutionary programs and ideals such as land reform and equality and those who opposed the FSLN.



Voices from the Silence · Guatemalan Literature of Resistance

Edited by Marc Zimmerman and Raúl Rojas

The conquest, colonization, independence, the liberal reforms, the regimes, revolution, and dictatorships, the insurrections and ongoing peace dialogues all are combined in a narrative projecting the most important forces in Guatemalan history from the Mayan period to our own times.


Taking power in Nicaragua in 1979 as a revolutionary party, the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) was willing to put its fate in the hands of the Nicaraguan people twice, in 1984 and 1990. The party wrote a democratic constitution and then, remarkably, accepted the decision of the majority by relinquishing power upon its defeat in the 1990 election.




Even in the period following the electoral defeat of the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) in 1990, the revolution of 1979 continues to have a profound effect on the political economy of Nicaragua.


How do economic weakness and dependence influence foreign policy decisions and behavior in third world countries? Theories in Dependent Foreign Policy examines six foreign policy theories: compliance, consensus, counterdependence, realism, leader preferences and domestic politics, and each is applied to a series of case studies of Ecuador’s foreign policy during the 1980s under two regimes: Osvaldo Hurtado (1981-1984) and his successor León Febres Cordero (1984-1988).