Since 1994 the U.S. Capitol Historical Society has conducted a series of conferences each fall on the art and architectural history of the United States Capitol planned with the cooperation of the Curator of the Office of the Architect of the Capitol, Dr. Barbara Wolanin. The Press is publishing the volumes resulting from this series.

“(Paris on the Potomac) is another consistently engaging and insightful collection of essays published as part of the Perspectives on the Art and Architectural History of the United States Capitol series…. As a whole, the collection underlies the importance of the French-American amity and offers Washington, D.C.—as much a European city as an American one—as irrefutable evidence that space and place are occupied by politics and ideology as much as they are by people.”
The Journal of Southern History


Editors

Donald Kennon, Senior Editor
US Capitol Historical Society

Incidental Architect · William Thornton and the Cultural Life of Early Washington, D.C., 1794–1828

By Gordon S. Brown


Paris on the Potomac · The French Influence on the Architecture and Art of Washington, D.C.

Edited by Cynthia R. Field, Isabelle Gournay, and Thomas P. Somma


American Pantheon · Sculptural and Artistic Decoration of the United States Capitol

Edited by Donald R. Kennon and Thomas P. Somma

Like the ancient Roman Pantheon, the U.S. Capitol was designed by its political and aesthetic arbiters to memorialize the virtues, events, and persons most representative of the nation's ideals—an attempt to raise a particular version of the nation's founding to the level of myth. American Pantheon examines the influences upon not only those virtues and persons selected for inclusion in the American pantheon, but also those excluded.


At the age of thirty-six, in 1852, Lt. Montgomery Cunningham Meigs of the Army Corps of Engineers reported to Washington, D.C., for duty as a special assistant to the chief army engineer, Gen. Joseph G. Totten. It was a fateful assignment, both for the nation’s capital and for the bright, ambitious, and politically connected West Point graduate. Meigs's forty-year tenure in the nation's capital was by any account spectacularly successful.


Art and Empire · The Politics of Ethnicity in the United States Capitol, 1815–1860

By Vivien Green Fryd


The United States Capitol · Designing and Decorating a National Icon

Edited by Donald R. Kennon

The United States Capitol is a national cultural icon, and among the most visually recognized seats of government in the world. The past quarter century has witnessed an explosion of scholarly interest in the art and architectural history of the Capitol. The emergence of the historic preservation movement and the maturation of the discipline of art conservation have refocused attention on the Capitol as the American “temple of liberty.”