Guidelines for Editorial Department Internship (English 491)

The editorial department intern will assist in the preparation of book manuscripts at the Ohio University Press, a not-for-profit scholarly press publishing academic and trade books. This position will expose the intern to a variety of tasks commonly expected of an entry-level editorial assistant in a scholarly or trade publishing house.

Candidates will be required to take and pass a keyboarding and proofreading test. The position requires meticulous attention to detail as well as a good command of English grammar and spelling. Macintosh computer skills and experience with Microsoft Word are helpful.

Because of the extensive training involved, this internship is offered with the expectation that the intern will work no fewer than ten hours per week and that the internship will continue for a minimum of two consecutive quarters. Extension of the internship for additional hours or additional quarters will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

The work covered by the internship will include as many of the following elements as time allows:

  1. Cleanup of manuscripts (preparation of manuscripts for the copyeditor, removal of extraneous formatting, application of Microsoft Word Styles);
  2. Entry of corrections (keying in author’s revisions from hard copy);
  3. Attendance at launch meeting(s);
  4. Filing CIP data application(s) with the Library of Congress;
  5. Checking permissions and images;
  6. Proofreading transcriptions against original documents;
  7. Proofreading jacket/cover copy, catalogue copy, advertising copy, and/or page proofs;
  8. Filing, photocopying, and general office work.

Interns will not have the opportunity to edit manuscripts.

This internship provides invaluable professional experience for students considering a career in publishing. For more information or to schedule a testing session, please contact Managing Editor Nancy Basmajian at (740) 593-1161 or basmajia@ohio.edu.


New Titles

Buying Time
Debt and Mobility in the Western Indian Ocean
In Buying Time, Thomas F. McDow synthesizes Indian Ocean, Middle Eastern, and East African studies as well as economic and social history to explain how, in the nineteenth century, credit, mobility, and kinship knit together a vast interconnected Indian Ocean region.


Peoples of the Inland Sea
Native Americans and Newcomers in the Great Lakes Region, 1600–1870
Diverse in their languages and customs, the Native American peoples of the Great Lakes region—the Miamis, Ho-Chunks, Potawatomis, Ojibwas, and many others—shared a tumultuous history. In the colonial era their rich homeland became a target of imperial ambition and an invasion zone for European diseases, technologies, beliefs, and colonists.


Count the Wings
The Life and Art of Charley Harper
When you look at a bird, do you see feathers and a beak? Or do you see circles and triangles? Artist Charley Harper spent his life reducing subjects to their simplest forms, their basic lines and shapes. This resulted in what he called minimal realism and the style that would become easily recognized as Charley Harper’s.


Hip-Hop in Africa
Prophets of the City and Dustyfoot Philosophers
Throughout Africa, artists use hip-hop both to describe their lives and to create shared spaces for uncensored social commentary, feminist challenges to patriarchy, and resistance against state institutions, while at the same time engaging with the global hip-hop community.


Lyrical Liberators
The American Antislavery Movement in Verse, 1831–1865
Before Black Lives Matter and Hamilton, there were abolitionist poets, who put pen to paper during an era when speaking out against slavery could mean risking your life.