Guidelines for Editorial Department Internship (English 491)

The editorial department intern will assist in the preparation of book manuscripts at the Ohio University Press, a not-for-profit scholarly press publishing academic and trade books. This position will expose the intern to a variety of tasks commonly expected of an entry-level editorial assistant in a scholarly or trade publishing house.

Candidates will be required to take and pass a keyboarding and proofreading test. The position requires meticulous attention to detail as well as a good command of English grammar and spelling. Macintosh computer skills and experience with Microsoft Word are helpful.

Because of the extensive training involved, this internship is offered with the expectation that the intern will work no fewer than ten hours per week and that the internship will continue for a minimum of two consecutive quarters. Extension of the internship for additional hours or additional quarters will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

The work covered by the internship will include as many of the following elements as time allows:

  1. Cleanup of manuscripts (preparation of manuscripts for the copyeditor, removal of extraneous formatting, application of Microsoft Word Styles);
  2. Entry of corrections (keying in author’s revisions from hard copy);
  3. Attendance at launch meeting(s);
  4. Filing CIP data application(s) with the Library of Congress;
  5. Checking permissions and images;
  6. Proofreading transcriptions against original documents;
  7. Proofreading jacket/cover copy, catalogue copy, advertising copy, and/or page proofs;
  8. Filing, photocopying, and general office work.

Interns will not have the opportunity to edit manuscripts.

This internship provides invaluable professional experience for students considering a career in publishing. For more information or to schedule a testing session, please contact Managing Editor Nancy Basmajian at (740) 593-1161 or basmajia@ohio.edu.


New Titles

Julius Nyerere
With vision, hard-nosed judgment, and biting humor, Julius Nyerere confronted the challenges of nation building in modern Africa. Constructing Tanzania out of a controversial Cold War union between Tanganyika and Zanzibar, Nyerere emerged as one of independent Africa’s most influential leaders.


Waste of Timelessness and Other Early Stories
Written when Anaïs Nin was in her twenties and living in France, the stories collected in Waste of Timelessness contain many elements familiar to those who know her later work as well as revelatory, early clues to themes developed in those more mature stories and novels.


Feeding Globalization
Madagascar and the Provisioning Trade, 1600–1800
Between 1600 and 1800, the promise of fresh food attracted more than seven hundred English, French, and Dutch vessels to Madagascar. Throughout this period, European ships spent months at sea in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, but until now scholars have not fully examined how crews were fed during these long voyages.


Trapeze
The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1947–1955
Anaïs Nin made her reputation through publication of her edited diaries and the carefully constructed persona they presented.


Thabo Mbeki
In this concise biography, ideally suited for the classroom, Adekeye Adebajo seeks to illuminate former South African president Thabo Mbeki’s contradictions and situate him in a pan-African pantheon.