A Ohio University Press Book

Tales of the Metric System
A Novel

By Imraan Coovadia

“The collected stories structure recalls David Mitchell's Ghostwritten, or Jennifer Egan’s A Visit From the Goon Squad. As a character says early on, ‘We get most of our energy from complications.’ These complications rapidly pile up, resulting in a layered, multifaceted narrative.”

Publishers Weekly

“Using the transition to the metric system as both the catalyst and symbol for radical change, Coovadia places his characters in a historical context that explains their triumphs and shortcomings without offering excuses.”

World Literature Today

“Imraan Coovadia is one of the best novelists to come out of South Africa in a long time. His prose is charming, clever and sly. A must read.”

Gary Shteyngart

Tales of the Metric System is about as good a book as you are likely to read on South Africa’s transition from struggle to power.”

Ray Hartley, Sunday Times

“On the borders there were new guerrilla armies. The rouble and the dollar had replaced the pound sterling. The kilometre and the kilogram and the litre were new ways of measuring miles and imperial pounds and fluid ounces. In Zaire, Patrice Lumumba had been murdered on the instruction of the White House.… The measurements made by Curzon College were as outdated as yards and inches. They didn’t know what counted.”

In Tales of the Metric System, Imraan Coovadia’s sere, direct sentences light a fire as he parses South Africa across the decades, from 1970 into the present. As Salman Rushdie used Indian independence in Midnight’s Children, Coovadia takes his homeland’s transition from imperial to metric measurements as his catalyst, holding South Africa up to the light and examining it from multiple perspectives. An elite white housewife married to a radical intellectual; a rock guitarist; the same guitarist’s granddaughter thirty years later; a teenaged boy at the mercy of mob justice — each story takes place over one of ten days across the decades, and each protagonist has his own stakes, her own moment in time, but each is equally caught in the eddies of change. Tales of the Metric System is clear eyed, harrowing, and formally daring.


Imraan Coovadia directs the creative writing program at the University of Cape Town. He is the author of several previous novels, including High Low In-between (winner of the Sunday Times Fiction Prize), and has written for the New York Times, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Review of Books, and elsewhere.

Order a print copy

Paperback · $15.16 · Add to Cart

Retail price: $18.95 · Save 20% ($15.16)

Hardcover · $30.4 · Add to Cart

Retail price: $38.00 · Save 20% ($30.4)

Download an electronic copy

Amazon Kindle Store Barnes & Noble NOOK Google Play iBooks Store

Availability and price vary according to vendor.

Share    Facebook icon  Email icon

Requests

Desk Copy Examination Copy Review Copy

Permission to reprint
Permission to photocopy or include in a course pack via Copyright Clearance Center

Downloads & Links

External Link

Picture

PDF

In Series

Modern African Writing

Related Subjects

Fiction · African Literature · African Studies · South Africa

Formats

Paperback

978-0-8214-2226-7
Retail price: $18.95, T.
Release date: Apr. 2016
394 pages · 5¼ × 8¼ in.
Rights:North America

Hardcover

978-0-8214-2225-0
Retail price: $38.00, S.
Release date: Apr. 2016
394 pages · 5¼ × 8¼ in.
Rights:North America

Electronic

978-0-8214-4564-8
Release date: Apr. 2016
≅ 394 pages
Rights:North America

Additional Praise for Tales of the Metric System

Tales of the Metric System leaves the reader with a sense of having undertaken a journey through the familiar only to arrive somewhere completely new.”

Aminatta Forna

“With Tales of the Metric System, Imraan Coovadia uses an innovative structure and masterful writing to craft a portrait of life in South Africa through the transition away from apartheid. By writing his novel as a series of short stories, with some characters reappearing and others referenced, Coovadia combines everyday life and political turmoil in a thoroughly enjoyable book. “

ForeWord Reviews