In the Balance of Power — 2008

Independent Black Politics and Third-Party Movements in the United States

By Omar H. Ali
Foreword by Eric Foner

“This timely book tracks African American political activity from the Revolutionary period into the 21st century. Essentially, Ali argues that African Americans achieved greater political influence outside of the two-party system, participating in third-party politics or through independent black political movements…. A well-documented and well-presented argument…original and thought provoking. Highly recommended.”

CHOICE

“Ali presents an important survey of the most popular independent and third party movements among African Americans since the founding of the country [and] captures the most important nuances of the ways that African Americans have fought for their own political and economic interests.”

Journal of African American Studies

“For far too long, conventional wisdom regarding black political participation has suggested that they comprise a monolithic, liberal voting bloc that moves in lockstep with the Democratic Party. Ali, however, shows that there are competing ideological traditions in black thought and that black voters will use other means to advance their interests when they are shut out by the two major parties.”

Journal of American Ethnic History

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Historically, most black voters in the United States have aligned themselves with one of the two major parties: the Republican Party from the time of the Civil War to the New Deal and, since the New Deal—and especially since the height of the modern civil rights movement—the Democratic Party. However, as In the Balance of Power convincingly demonstrates, African Americans have long been part of independent political movements and have used third parties to advance some of the most important changes in the United States, notably the abolition of slavery, the extension of voting rights, and the enforcement of civil rights.

Since the early nineteenth century, there has been an undercurrent of political independence among African Americans. They helped develop the Liberty Party in the 1840s and have continued to work with third parties to challenge the policies of the two major parties. But despite the legal gains of the modern civil rights movement, elements of Jim Crow remain deeply embedded in our electoral process.

In the Balance of Power presents a history and analysis of African American third-party movements that can help us better understand the growing diversity among black voters today.


Picture of Omar H. Ali

Omar H. Ali is an associate professor of African American and Diaspora History at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro. A graduate of the London School of Economics, he received his Ph.D. in history from Columbia University.

Cover of 'In the Balance of Power'

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PDF978-0-8214-4288-3
Paperback978-0-8214-1807-9
Hardcover978-0-8214-1806-2

216 pages · 6 × 9 in.

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