Paul Herron

Paul Herron is the founder and editor of Sky Blue Press, which publishes the journal A Café in Space and digital editions of the fiction of Anaïs Nin, as well as a new collection of Nin erotica, Auletris.

Listed in: Literary Studies · American Literature · Women Authors · Diaries and Journals · Anaïs Nin




Trapeze · The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1947–1955
By Anaïs Nin · Edited by Paul Herron · Introduction by Benjamin Franklin V · Preface by Paul Herron

Anaïs Nin made her reputation through publication of her edited diaries and the carefully constructed persona they presented. It was not until decades later, when the diaries were published in their unexpurgated form, that the world began to learn the full details of Nin’s fascinating life and the emotional and literary high-wire acts she committed both in documenting it and in defying the mores of 1950s America.

“Nin’s diaries still challenge and astonish today because she was utterly daring.…The unexpurgated diaries illuminate the spectacular process of self-mythology for a courageous wife, lover, and artist.…[In Trapeze], striving to reconcile a split existence, Nin finds herself marking down dissatisfactions with each man’s shortcomings and tempting fate in thrilling ventures, although she cannot help but behold both with understanding, compassion, and love. Trapezeoffers Nin’s solution to such a dilemma: embrace ambivalence. Choose everything, choose both, choose between, and choose all.”

World Literature Today




Trapeze · The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1947–1955
By Anaïs Nin · Edited by Paul Herron · Introduction by Benjamin Franklin V · Preface by Paul Herron

Anaïs Nin made her reputation through publication of her edited diaries and the carefully constructed persona they presented. It was not until decades later, when the diaries were published in their unexpurgated form, that the world began to learn the full details of Nin’s fascinating life and the emotional and literary high-wire acts she committed both in documenting it and in defying the mores of 1950s America.

“Nin’s diaries still challenge and astonish today because she was utterly daring.…The unexpurgated diaries illuminate the spectacular process of self-mythology for a courageous wife, lover, and artist.…[In Trapeze], striving to reconcile a split existence, Nin finds herself marking down dissatisfactions with each man’s shortcomings and tempting fate in thrilling ventures, although she cannot help but behold both with understanding, compassion, and love. Trapezeoffers Nin’s solution to such a dilemma: embrace ambivalence. Choose everything, choose both, choose between, and choose all.”

World Literature Today




Mirages · The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1939–1947
By Anaïs Nin · Edited by Paul Herron · Introduction by Kim Krizan · Preface by Paul Herron

Mirages opens at the dawn of World War II, when Anaïs Nin fled Paris, where she lived for fifteen years with her husband, banker Hugh Guiler, and ends in 1947 when she meets the man who would be “the One,” the lover who would satisfy her insatiable hunger for connection. In the middle looms a period Nin describes as “hell,” during which she experiences a kind of erotic madness, a delirium that fuels her search for love.

“The celebrated diarist, novelist and electric personality reappears with all the fire of her eroticism in pages untouched by a Bowdler or a Puritan…. Readers will find Nin a most entertaining companion—her multiple simultaneous relationships with men, her gleefully graphic descriptions of sex acts…. In one late entry, Nin complains, mildly: ‘My world is so large I get lost in it’; readers will do the same—and gratefully so.”

Kirkus Reviews




Mirages · The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1939–1947
By Anaïs Nin · Edited by Paul Herron · Introduction by Kim Krizan · Preface by Paul Herron

Mirages opens at the dawn of World War II, when Anaïs Nin fled Paris, where she lived for fifteen years with her husband, banker Hugh Guiler, and ends in 1947 when she meets the man who would be “the One,” the lover who would satisfy her insatiable hunger for connection. In the middle looms a period Nin describes as “hell,” during which she experiences a kind of erotic madness, a delirium that fuels her search for love.

“The celebrated diarist, novelist and electric personality reappears with all the fire of her eroticism in pages untouched by a Bowdler or a Puritan…. Readers will find Nin a most entertaining companion—her multiple simultaneous relationships with men, her gleefully graphic descriptions of sex acts…. In one late entry, Nin complains, mildly: ‘My world is so large I get lost in it’; readers will do the same—and gratefully so.”

Kirkus Reviews