Paul Finkelman is an expert in constitutional history and constitutional law, freedom of religion, the law of slavery, civil liberties and the American Civil War, and legal issues surrounding baseball. He is the author of more than thirty books, and coedits the Ohio University Press series New Approaches to Midwestern Studies.


In Essentials, Unity · An Economic History of the Grange Movement

By Jenny Bourne · Preface by Paul Finkelman

The Patrons of Husbandry—or the Grange—is the longest-lived US agricultural society and, since its founding shortly after the Civil War, has had immeasurable influence on social change as enacted by ordinary Americans. The Grange sought to relieve the struggles of small farmers by encouraging collaboration. Pathbreaking for its inclusion of women, the Grange is also well known for its association with Gilded Age laws aimed at curbing the monopoly power of railroads.


“When Lincoln took office, in March 1861, the national government had no power to touch slavery in the states where it existed. Lincoln understood this, and said as much in his first inaugural address, noting: ‘I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists.’”


Justice and Legal Change on the Shores of Lake Erie · A History of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio

Edited by Paul Finkelman and Roberta Sue Alexander

Explores the many ways that the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio has affected the region, the nation, the development of American law, and American politics.



In the Shadow of Freedom · The Politics of Slavery in the National Capital

Edited by Paul Finkelman and Donald R. Kennon



Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism · From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson

Edited by Paul Finkelman and Donald R. Kennon



Terrible Swift Sword · The Legacy of John Brown

Edited by Peggy A. Russo and Paul Finkelman

More than two centuries after his birth and almost a century and a half after his death, the legendary life and legacy of John Brown go marching on. Variously deemed martyr, madman, monster, terrorist, and saint, he remains one of the most controversial figures in America’s history. Brown’s actions in Kansas and in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, were major catalysts for the American Civil War, and continue today to evoke praise or condemnation.


New Titles

Slow Burn
An Andy Hayes Mystery
Almost two years have passed since Aaron Custer supposedly set a fire at a house in Columbus that killed three college students, when it starts to seem likely that the wrong man is in prison.


Capitol Punishment
An Andy Hayes Mystery
All eyes are on swing state Ohio in the midst of a presidential election, and protecting a controversial reporter seems simple enough to Andy. But then a body shows up in the Statehouse.


The Hunt
An Andy Hayes Mystery
As a serial killer stalks prostitutes in Columbus, Ohio, a distraught brother asks private investigator Andy Hayes to find his sister before it’s too late. In a deadly race against time, Andy soon learns he’s not the only person hunting Jessica Byrnes, but he may be the only one who wants her alive.


Midwestern Native Shrubs and Trees
Gardening Alternatives to Nonnative Species
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An Uncertain Age
The Politics of Manhood in Kenya
In twentieth-century Kenya, age and gender were powerful cultural and political forces that animated household and generational relationships. They also shaped East Africans’ contact with and influence on emergent colonial and global ideas about age and masculinity.