Joseph C. Miller

Joseph C. Miller is the T. Cary Johnson, Jr. Professor of history at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Kings and Kinsmen, Way of Death, and works on the world history of slavery.

Listed in: History · African Child · International Studies · Children's Studies · African Studies · Slavery and Slave Trade · American History · Global Issues · Latin American History · Women’s Studies · Women’s History · African History · Latin American Studies




Child Slaves in the Modern World is the second of two volumes that examine the distinctive uses and experiences of children in slavery in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This collection of previously unpublished essays exposes the global victimization of child slaves from the period of abolition of legal slavery in the nineteenth century to the human rights era of the twentieth century.

“The subject of children and slavery has only recently become a special focus of scholars…. The focus on children as such is, therefore, a significant breakthrough in understanding slavery as a system in different institutionalized contexts.”

Journal of African History




Significant numbers of the people enslaved throughout world history have been children. The vast literature on slavery has grown to include most of the history of this ubiquitous practice, but nearly all of it concentrates on the adult males whose strong bodies and laboring capacities preoccupied the masters of the modern Americas.

“This anthology epitomized the strengths of the new history of slavery: a world-wide perspective that cuts across time and space … and an emphasis on the actual experience of enslavement and on enslaved peoples as active agents with their own distinct voices.”

Steven Mintz, author of Huck’s Raft: A History of American Childhood




The literature on women enslaved around the world has grown rapidly in the last ten years, evidencing strong interest in the subject across a range of academic disciplines.

“I believe these essays have an audience among anyone interested not only in the intersecting histories of slavery and women, but also those who are intrigued more generally by the historian's craft.”

Susan E. O’Donovan, coeditor of Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation, 1861–1867 and author of Slavery's Legacies: Becoming Free in the Cotton South




Women and Slavery, Volume One · Africa, the Indian Ocean World, and the Medieval North Atlantic
Edited by Gwyn Campbell, Suzanne Miers, and Joseph C. Miller

The literature on women enslaved around the world has grown rapidly in the last ten years, evidencing strong interest in the subject across a range of academic disciplines.

“…(Women & Slavery, Volume 1 clearly demonstrates that far from simply being a by-product of a trade in male slaves, in many societies women were the prime focus of the slave trade.…”

Africa: The Journal of the IAI