Janet Groth

Janet Groth is emeritus professor of English at the State University of New York at Plattsburgh. She is the author of Edmund Wilson: A Critic for Our Time.

Listed in: Biography · American Literature · Literary Criticism · Letters · Journalism · Literary Studies

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Among the major writers of the Hemingway and Fitzgerald generation, Edmund Wilson defied categorization. He wrote essays, stories and novels, cultural criticism, and contemporary chronicles, as well as journals and thousands of letters about the literary life and his own private world. Here for the first time in print is Wilson's personal correspondence to his parents, lovers and wives, children, literary comrades, and friends from the different corners of his life.

"A portrait emerges of a prolific author who not only cared deeply about literature and social issues but who also was a son, husband, father, colleague, and friend. Not all of the letters make fascinating reading, but for those who admire Wilson this volume is essential."

Library Journal




Many of Wilson's writings have been anthologized. But there is another body of work — over fifty fine essays on aspects of contemporary literature and ideas — that have been scattered in a variety of magazines, including The New Yorker, The New Republic, Vanity Fair, and The Nation.

From the Uncollected Edmund Wilson contains a rich and varied selection of notes and reviews covering Wilson's entire career…It reveals how professionally dedicated he was, even when engaged in routine writing for periodicals.”

John L. Brown, World Literature Today




Winner of the 1998 NEMLA-Ohio University Press Book Award
A Choice Outstanding Academic Book

Edmund Wilson · A Critic For Our Time
By Janet Groth

In the course of a career that spanned five decades, Edmund Wilson’s literary output was impressive. His life’s work includes five volumes of poetry, two works of fiction, thirteen plays, and more than twenty volumes of social commentary on travel, politics, history, religion, anthropology, and economics. It is, however, his criticism for which Wilson is best known. To note a few of his accomplishments as a critic, Wilson furthered the understanding and appreciation of the poetry of W.B.

“The greatest literary critic of the twentieth century.”

New York magazine