Howard P. Kainz

Howard P. Kainz is a professor of philosophy at Marquette University. He is the author of Hegel's Phenomenology, Parts I and II (Ohio, 1994, 1983) and An Introduction to Hegel: The Stages of Modern Philosophy (Ohio, 1996).

Listed in: Philosophy




G. W. F. Hegel · The Philosophical System
By Howard P. Kainz

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, perhaps the most influential of all German philosophers, made one of the last great attempts to develop philosophy as an all-embracing scientific system. This system places Hegel among the “classical” philosophers—Aristotle, Aquinas, Spinoza—who also attempted to build grand conceptual edifices.




An Introduction To Hegel · The Stages of Modern Philosophy
By Howard P. Kainz

In a sense it would be inappropriate to speak of “Hegel’s system of philosophy,” because Hegel thought that in the strict sense there is only one system of philosophy evolving in the Western world.

“The paraphrase is supplemented by helpful editorial material. In addition to his notes, Kainz provides a succinct preface, which introduce the Lectures and explains his stance toward them, and an afterword, which summarizes some of their highlights and sets them into the context of Hegel's greater project.”

John Heffner, The Owl of Minerva




Hegel’s Phenomenology, Part 1 · Analysis and Commentary
By Howard P. Kainz

The publication in 1807 of Georg Wilhelm Frederich Hegel's Phanomenologie des Geistes (translated alternately as "Phenomenology of the Mind" or "Phenomenology of the Spirit") marked the beginning of the modern era in philosophy. Hegel's remarkable insights formed the basis for what eventually became the Existentialist movement. Yet the Phenomenology remains one of the most difficult and forbidding works in the canon of philosophical literature.




Philosophical Perspectives On Peace · Anthology of Classical & Modern Sources
By Howard P. Kainz

Philosophizing about peace has been a consistent occupation of major figures in the history of philosophy and letters since the Middle Ages. Immanuel Kant’s Eternal Peace is well-known and is still being widely studied.

“…Philosophical Perspectives is immensely readable. It could hardly be otherwise, given the contributors.”

Adewale Maja-Pearce




Hegel’s Phenomenology, Part 2 · The Evolution of Ethical and Religious Consciousness to the Absolute Standpoint
By Howard P. Kainz

The publication in 1807 of Georg Wilhelm Frederich Hegel's Phanomenologie des Geistes (translated alternately as “Phenomenology of Mind” or “Phenomenology of Spirit”) marked the beginning of the modern era in philosophy. Hegel's remarkable insights formed the basis for what eventually became the Existentialist movement. Yet the Phenomenology remains one of the most difficult and forbidding works in the canon of philosophical literature.

“Kainz's commentary is rich with suggestive ideas for filling in the historical context and appreciating the perennial significance of the Phenomenology.”

Ardis B. Collins, The Owl of Minerva