Frederick M. Nunn is a visiting professor of history and Latin American studies at the University of Arizona in Tucson. The author and editor of many works on Latin America, he is former vice provost for international affairs at Portland State University.

Collisions with History

Latin American Fiction and Social Science from “El Boom” to the New World Order

By Frederick M. Nunn

Latin American intellectuals have traditionally debated their region’s history, never with so much agreement as in the fiction, commentary, and scholarship of the late twentieth century. Collisions with History shows how “fictional histories” of discovery and conquest, independence and early nationhood, and the recent authoritarian past were purposeful revisionist collisions with received national versions.


Ken Saro-Wiwa
A penetrating, accessible portrait of the activist whose execution galvanized the world.


Nation on Board
Becoming Nigerian at Sea
Schler’s study of Nigerian seamen during Nigeria’s transition to independence provides a fresh perspective on the meaning of decolonization for ordinary Africans.


Culture and Money in the Nineteenth Century
Abstracting Economics
Since the 1980s, scholars have made the case for examining nineteenth-century culture — particularly literary output — through the lens of economics.


Veteran Narratives and the Collective Memory of the Vietnam War
In the decades since the Vietnam War, veteran memoirs have influenced Americans’ understanding of the conflict. Yet few historians or literary scholars have scrutinized how the genre has shaped the nation’s collective memory of the war and its aftermath.


Tales of the Metric System
A Novel
Imraan Coovadia takes his homeland’s transition from imperial to metric measurements as his catalyst, holding South Africa up to the light and examining it from multiple perspectives, his sere, direct sentences lighting a fire as he parses South Africa across the decades, from 1970 into the present.