Alexander Blackburn

Listed in: Literary Criticism · Western Americana · Fiction · American Literature · Literary Studies




Higher Elevations · Stories From The West: A Writers' Forum Anthology
Edited by Alexander Blackburn and C. Kenneth Pellow

Higher Elevations: Stories from the West is a rich and varied anthology of fiction from Writers' Forum. As the subtitle promises, it is regional, but these are not all stories from your grandfather's (or Hollywood's) West.

"Higher Elevations is one of those marvelous books that comes along so rarely that its appearance is a cause for celebration, its existence a source of wonder...Higher Elevations should be a joy for both the casual reader and the serious student of contemporary western storytelling."

Paul Scott Malone, Concho River Review




Sunrise Brighter Still · The Visionary Novels of Frank Waters
By Alexander Blackburn · Foreword by Charles L. Adams

Novelist and critic Alexander Blackburn credits Waters’s novels such as The Man Who Killed the Deer, Pike’s Peak, People of the Valley, and The Woman at Otowi Crossing with creating a worldview that transcends modern materialism and rationalism. Central to Waters’s vision, he suggests, is the individual in whom are concentrated the creative powers of the universe.

“This is an insightful well written study of an American writer whose vision and depth are yet to be fully appreciated. A Sunrise Brighter Still should help to elevate the works of Frank Waters to the level they so richly deserve.”

Jack Kean, Colorado Libraries




Interior Country · Stories of the Modern West
Edited by Alexander Blackburn, Craig Lesley, and Jill Landem

A mile down the road from the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, a woman unearths an ancient shard of pottery bearing the thousands-year-old thumbprint of a Navawi'i woman. A marriage is thrown into crisis by the husband's discovery, on a fishing trip, of a girl’s corpse. To impress the prostitute he wants to marry, a man constructs a homemade atomic bomb.

“Using [an] eclectic collection of material, The Interior Country redefines the Western experience moving away from popular, old clichés and stereotypes towards new limits and a surreal consciousness which ominously encompasses the dangers of the nuclear age.”

Robert F. Walch, Journal of the West